Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Scania.
    Johansson, Hanna
    Scania.
    Johnsson, Johanna
    Scania.
    Detecting sleepiness by Optalert: final report2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many crashes with heavy vehicle can be attributed to driver sleepiness or driving impairment due to sleepiness, and it is important to find methods to predict those situations and counteract this problem. The Optalert fatigue management system claims to be able to detect sleepiness. The aims of this study are to (a) evaluate if Optalert can detect sleepiness equally well as other sleepiness indicators and (b) if the data patterns obtained by Optalert correlates with these other sleepiness indicators. Twelve sleep deprived truck drivers drove for about 90 minutes in an advanced moving base truck simulator. The experimental setup, including the sleep deprivation, was designed so that the drivers should become increasingly sleepier during the trial and the intention was that they should fall asleep during the experiment.

    Four different indicators of sleepiness or driving impairment due to sleepiness were used to monitor the state of the drivers; the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the variability in lateral position (SDLP), the blink duration and the Optalert system. The results show that all four sleepiness indicators increased with time on task. An analysis of variance revealed that the changes were significant for KSS, blink duration and the Optalert system, and a correlation analysis showed that Optalert correlated significantly with blink duration and SDLP. However, even though these correlations were significant, they were all rather low with a maximum correlation coefficient of 0.24.

    In conclusion, the Optalert system is promising and the sleepiness rating provided by the system works at least equally well as the other three sleepiness indicators. There are some practical limitations to the system; there is no reliable threshold which can be used to determine when a driver is getting too sleepy to drive (this is also the case for other available sleepiness indicators), the driver needs to be attached to the vehicle via the spectacle frames and a wire, and the quality of the eye movement recordings often deteriorated when the driver started driving the truck. Moreover, during the experiment the technical reliability was sometimes low.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Eriksson, Gabriella
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Abadir Guirgis, Georg
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Bagdadi, Omar
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Ihlström, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Sommarström, Erik
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Thorslund, Birgitta
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Läsbarhet av vägskyltar i form av LED-skylt: färgkombination och fontstorlekens betydelse för läsbarheten2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The readability of road signs was studied and in particular the LED format. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of color combination, font size and light conditions on readability. 101 students participated in the study, where 32 were men and 69 were women. Their age ranged from 18–66 years. The choice of subjects were driven by the study's purpose, i.e. for this study it was not of interest to study the differences between gender, age or eyesight. A statistical analysis was carried out to study how readability distances varied as a result of the combination of colors, font size and light conditions. Furthermore, illuminance was measured when the data collection occasions was conducted. Distances were examined both in daylight and in darkness. The results of the study show that the color combination of the LED-sign affects its readability. Signs with white text on blue, brown or green background could be read correctly at a greater distance than the signs with black text on white or orange background. The font size is also important for the readability and every increase in font size produces a significant difference in the distance that the sign can be read. The sign with the largest font size (300 mm) was read correctly from the longest distance. The signs were read even at greater distances in daylight than in darkness. The readability of the sign with the smallest font size 200 mm does not change significantly during the daylight compared to darkness conditions. These conclusive results demonstrate that all the variables studied are important for readability. It should be added that participants stood still during the trial when they scanned/read the signs and had free sight to the LED-sign.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Peters, Björn
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driving Simulation and Visualization.
    Simulatorbaserad testmetod: bedömning av körförmåga hos individer med synfältsbortfall2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the project was to develop a method to assess if individuals with visual field loss can drive in a safe manner. The starting point for the project was that the method should be a simulator based method because essentially two criteria were desirable. First, it was important that several events occurred systematically and that events were possible to evaluate, i.e., that it was possible to discriminate between good and bad performances. Second, these events should be the same events for all individuals that was to be tested. The aim was to develop a method that optimizes the validity and reliability with respect to testing of each and one of unique individuals. The testing procedure of the individual level was important because the method would not be used for research purposes but primarily to determine whether a unique individual with visual field loss can drive in a safe manner. Several details that can go wrong during an ordinary experiment, when running subjects, have a minimal impact concerning the experiment because it is most often possible to complement the experimental data collection with another subject. This is not an option for this project.

    These criteria and points raised above collectively resulted in the method developed. When an individual completed the scenario developed, a test protocol was generated (after a lot of work). This protocol reveals how the individual performed during the 37 (+2) events (and related measures) based on a safety margin perspective. To support the rater with the assessment of a subject a) data from a reference group (over 100 individuals) and b) a developed test protocol (with critical thresholds for different measurements) were used. The assessment was carried out by two independent raters. If the raters agreed no further judgments were performed. If the raters disagreed a third rater assessed the subjects’ performance. The purpose of the test protocol is that those individuals who want to use the test protocol results as a basis for an exemption application, can do so. It is still the Transport Agency, which decides on an exemption cases.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Peters, Björn
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Visual reaction time abilities relation to driving performance: a simulator based driving performance experiment with visually impaired individuals2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature suggests that ocular diseases are negatively related to driving performance. The factors associated with safe driving is discussed and perceptual abilities are suggested to be related to crash involvement. The present study will focus on i) perceptual tasks or reaction time tasks and ii) attentional and cognitive tasks. All tasks will be visual and cognitive demanding and the objective is to understand how different visual cognitive tasks are related to driving performance. The motive is to be able to discriminate between safe versus unsafe drivers with visual deficits but also understand how different mental mechanisms are related to safe, or unsafe, driving.

    The reaction time tasks are interesting since the reaction time of participants in the study can be measured when performing the driving task. The participants’ reaction time when an object is possible to detect can be measured i) within the complex driving scenario as well as in tasks ii) mimicking driving and iii) “regular” computerized reaction time tasks such as the Simon task. Hence, the objective is two-folded to develop a simulator based method able to discriminate between safe versus unsafe drivers (among the visual deficit population). Second, to pinpoint the importance of visual reaction time and different cognitive tasks on driving performance.

    The cognitive, attentional demanding tasks are not as analyzed at this point but will be elaborated on in the presentation. The tasks are presented in the method section.

    The summarised data on patients with Glaucoma, Cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and diabetic retinopathy reveal, on a general level, is that ocular diseases impair driver performance.  The literature also suggests, for instance, that not all Glaucoma patients fail on-road driving tests. In summary, the majority of the research literature results indicate, a) general decline in driving performance due to a visual impairment, but b) this is not true for all patients with the same visual deficit.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Renner, Linda
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Sandin, Jesper
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle technology and simulation. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human Factors in the Transport System.
    Strand, Niklas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle technology and simulation. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Hjort, Mattias
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Andersson Hultgren, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Almqvist, Sverker
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Trafiksäkerhetspåverkan vid omkörning av 30-metersfordon2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Road Administration considers permitting longer and heavier trucks on Swedish roads, provided that they do not affect traffic safety. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of truck length, particularly accident risk associated with overtaking. Interviewed drivers of 30 meter trucks had not experienced the problems predicted by drivers of ordinary trucks concerning narrow roundabouts and intersections, but mentioned the importance of a supportive truck company, working environment and truck equipment. A simulator study investigated car drivers overtaking trucks 30 m and 18.75 m long on a 2+1 road where two lanes merges to one. The headway time gap was 0.2 sec. (sign.) shorter after overtaking the 30 meter truck in situations where the back was in the same relative position as of the 18.75 meter truck. A field study analysed video-recorded overtakings of a 30 meter and a 24 meter timber truck on a 2+1 road and a two-lane road. No significant differences were found between headway time gaps when overtaking the two trucks, regardless of road type. The latter result should be interpreted with great caution because of unevenly distributed data collected during specific conditions. The conclusions are that longer trucks may have a small negative effect on overtaking situations, and that further field studies are required.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Sandin, Jesper
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Renner, Linda
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Strand, Niklas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Hjort, Mattias
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle technology and simulation.
    Hultgren, J
    Almqvist, S
    Traffic safety effects when overtaking 30 meter trucks2012In: Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics 2012- 14 Volume Set: Proceedings of the 4th AHFE Conference 21-25 July 2012 / [ed] Gavriel Salvendy, Waldemar Karwowski, Taylor & Francis, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate if the introduction of extra-long and heavy trucks has an effect on traffic safety on Swedish roads, especially in relation to overtaking maneuvers. Traffic safety effects will be measured in terms of road user behavior concerning accelerations and time slots. First, focus group interviews with heavy truck drivers. Truck drivers that do not drive extra-long trucks believe that the introduction of extra-long trucks will create a number of traffic safety problems especially in terms of conflicts with ordinary road users. The drivers of extra-long trucks do not experience the problems that ordinary truck drivers predict. The problems they experience can be taken care of with more planning (thinking ahead). They also believe that the traffic sign on the back of the extra-long vehicle has a positive effect. The truck company, working environment and truck equipment are other important aspects mentioned by the drivers of the extra-long vehicles.

    The simulator study investigates overtaking situations on a 2+1-lane highway, with extra-long trucks (30.4 m) and ordinary trucks (18.75 m). The results reveal that the distance from the rear/front of the truck to the point where only one lane exists affects car drivers’ decision to overtake, independently of truck length. If the truck is in the relatively same position, the timeslot for a safe overtaking maneuver before next one-lane section was reduced significantly for extra-long trucks compared to ordinary trucks. The conclusion is that there exist small tendencies which point in the direction of enhanced traffic safety problems with the introduction of extra-long trucks. The results should, however, be interpreted with caution as the number of data points was few and collected in specific situations and in specific conditions. It was neither considered how the introduction of longer and heavier trucks, given a constant amount of goods, reduces the number of heavy trucks on the road network.

  • 7. Camuffo, I
    et al.
    Cicilloni, R
    Fürstenberg, K
    Westhoff, D
    Aparicio, A
    Benmimoun, M
    Lützow, J
    Lesemann, M
    Zlocki, A
    Eriksson, H
    Herard, J
    Jacobson, J
    Bilbao, N
    Iglesias, I
    Isasi, L
    Sanchez, J
    Leanderson, S
    Heinig, K
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Bruzelius, Fredrik
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Jansson, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Concepts definition2009Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Canovi, Luca
    et al.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia.
    Minin, Luca
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Sandin, Jesper
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Kircher, Katja
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Kutila, Matti
    VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland.
    Britschgi, Virpi
    VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland.
    Sachelarie, Adrian
    The Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of Iasi.
    Barsanescu, Paul
    The Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of Iasi.
    Janos, Stautz
    Clarity Consulting Info rmation and Management Services.
    Eckstein, Bernd
    Univ ersity of Stuttgart.
    Regulation knowledge presentation2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ASSET-Road project is focussing on improving road safety and road traffic by pushing different transportation stakeholders to interact between each other and integrating modern communication and sensing technologies. This deliverable is the result of the project tasks 3.1 (Regulation knowledge & awareness study), 3.2 (Situation identification & information presentation) and part of task 3.3 (Smart information provision Mechanism & HMI). In brief, objectives of the deliverable are: 1. to report the study conducted in task 3.1 where information about how deep drivers’ knowledge is (for truck and coaches drivers) have been collected in several countries in relation to road and safety regulations (e.g. speed limits on different roads, traffic rules, safety equipments, etc.). This is the first part of the document and includes two studies, the first one conducted in Europe and the second one conducted in Tanzania; a comparison between them is proposed; 2. to describe the smart In-Vehicle Information System specifications based on the requirements collected in WP1 (task 1.2 Users needs and requirements). In this section systems features are briefly introduced and the simulator study setup where the system will be tested is described, including scenario setup, situation identification and simulator iterations.

  • 9.
    Ihs, Anita
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Infrastructure, Infrastructure maintenance.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Kircher, Katja
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Bolling, Anne
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle technology and simulation.
    Trafikanternas krav på vägars tillstånd: en körsimulatorstudie2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    In order to get a view on the road surface condition the Swedish Road Administration (SRA) uses both objective measurement mehods, mainly measurements of rut depth and unevenness, and road users, opinions on the roads condition. Objective measurements show that road surface condition in general has not changed to any greater extent during the latest years. Road user surveys show, however, that the road users, and not least the professional drivers, have become less satisfied with the operation and maintenace of the roads. To try to understand the cause of this discrepancy it is of interest to closer analyse the road users assessment of road surface condition. The report presents a driving simulator study, which is divided into two experiments. In the first experiment the importance of different impressions, i.e. visual appearance, noise and vibrations, is tested on a road surface with ruts as well as on a road surface with patchings/repairs. The analysis was based on driving data and on the drivers´ opinions on how comfortable and safe, respectively, the road was to drive on. The conclusion from the first experiment was that the visual apppearence alone does not influence speed, but lateral position. Noise has an influence on the variance of speed, and vibration has an influence on the variance of lateral position. Noise and vibration have an influence on speed in interaction with the visual appearance. The results of the drivers´ assessments of comfort and safety show a clear pattern where the visual appearance, the sound and the vibrations separately and in an additional way have an influence on the subjective experience of comfort and safety. In the second experiment eight road surfaces with different road surface conditions (patches, ruts, ruts filled with water, rough texture, unnevenness (two levels), cracks and edge deformations). The eight road surfaces grouped together in three different groups concerning the assessment of comfort and of safety, though not in the exact same way.

  • 10.
    Jansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Driving simulation cooperation strategy: pre-study report2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving simulation is a large and truly inter-disciplinary research field. It involves visualization, vehicle dynamics, motion cueing, sound rendering and much more. Furthermore, research conducted in driving simulators has applications in almost all areas of transportation from road, infrastructure and vehicle design to human behaviour and human factors. Apart from research applications, other important areas using driving simulation are for example product development, training and education, demonstration and visualization, race car tuning and gaming. The pre-study reported here has been conducted on assignment from Chalmers. The focus has been on how to build and maintain competence and knowledge in the field of driving simulation, and how to efficiently manage resources, such as maintenance of the technical equipment, for simulation activities to become cost effective. Also, the driving simulation methodology as one link in a tool chain has been considered concerning synergies, connections and cooperation possibilities with other research methodologies. The pre-study has resulted in: - A survey of the field of advanced driving simulation globally. - A synthesis of pros and cons of commercial and own developed simulation software. - A review of on-going simulator activities in Sweden, at Chalmers and at VTI. - A proposal for a cooperation strategy in the field of driving simulation.

  • 11.
    Johnsen, Annika
    et al.
    IfeS.
    Strand, Niklas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Patten, Christopher
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.
    Kraetsch, Clemens
    IfeS.
    Takman, Johanna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics.
    Eriksson, Gabriella (Contributor)
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Lindgren, Hanna (Contributor)
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics.
    Možina, Katarina (Contributor)
    AMZS.
    Rey, Alba (Contributor)
    ACASA.
    Literature review on the acceptance and road safety, ethical, legal, social and economic implications of automated vehicles2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This deliverable summarizes the findings of an extensive literature review on the acceptance, behavioural intentions, road safety, as well as ethical, legal, social (ELSI) and economic considerations in the scope of vehicle automation.

    The theoretical fundaments and relevant findings of recent public opinion research regarding user acceptance of automation are presented. Also the view of organised stakeholders is taken into account.

    Regarding road safety there is a potential for increased road safety but drivers tend to pick up non-related driving tasks instead. These problems are due to several traditional HMI concerns. In the future autonomous cars must make decisions that touch on ethical issues that have not yet been sufficiently and transparently discussed. Although in many countries legislation is now reacting to the new technology, many aspects – like liability and privacy / data protection – are not yet regulated by law. Automated vehicles promise to have several clear benefits that might change the entire transport system. The positive externalities that come from the technological advantages of automated vehicles might be outweighed by the negative externalities coming from the potential increases in travelling by private vehicles.

  • 12.
    Kircher, Katja
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Road safety in Tanzania: a questionnaire study2010In: Road safety on four continents: Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 28-30 March 2010: Conference proceedings / [ed] Gustafson, Kent, 2010, p. 1093-1104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the traffic fatality risk (fatalities per 100 000 inhabitants) in Tanzania is quite low, the fatality rate (fatalities per 10 000 vehicles) is one of the highest in the world. With increasing vehicle density this means that the number of people dying in traffic will increase dramatically in the near future. Therefore it is important to implement measures to increase traffic safety as soon as possible, and in order to be able to do this in an efficient way, it is important to investigate where the main problems lie. Within the EU project ASSET-Road a questionnaire study on road safety was conducted with 250 truck drivers in Tanzania. The study was done to increase the knowledge about the situation of the Tanzanian truckers, who are the most frequent road users in the country. The drivers were interviewed in three different towns in southern Tanzania, and participation was voluntary. The questionnaire treated demographics, the state of the drivers’ vehicles, the frequency of breakdowns and the maintenance of the vehicles. Further questions were concerned with driver behaviour, crash involvement, crash risk and crash mitigation. The drivers who participated in the study were predominantly male, their average age was 36 years. Around 40 % of the trucks did not have any seat belts installed, with a larger share of older trucks lacking belts. Most of the drivers who had seat belts reported to use them, however. Almost 40 % of the drivers reported to have been involved in at least one crash, and 45 % of those drivers had experienced fatal crashes. This underlines that crashes counted per vehicle are very frequent, and the results are often severe, especially when heavy vehicles are involved. Truck drivers reported to drive 10.6 hours without break on average, with several drivers reporting that they had to drive 24 hours without rest. When asked what the three most common crash causes were, driver related causes were prominent. Drivers were said to be reckless, further causes named often were drunkenness, inattention and sleepiness. One of the most mentioned crash mitigation strategy was driver education, but also improvement of the roads and the vehicles. This indicates that countermeasures should be implemented in an integrated fashion, taking the aspects driver, vehicle, infrastructure, legislature and other road users into account.

  • 13.
    Kircher, Katja
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Truck drivers' opinion on road safety in Tanzania: A questionnaire study2012In: Traffic Injury Prevention, ISSN 1538-9588, E-ISSN 1538-957X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 103-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the traffic fatality risk (fatalities per 100 000 inhabitants) in Tanzania is quite low, the fatality rate (fatalities per 10 000 vehicles) is one of the highest in the world. Since vehicle density will increase it is important to implement measures to increase traffic safety.

    Within the EU project ASSET-Road a questionnaire study on road safety was conducted with 250 truck drivers in Tanzania. The drivers were interviewed in three different towns in southern Tanzania, and participation was voluntary. The questionnaire treated demographics, the state of the drivers' vehicles, the frequency of breakdowns and the maintenance of the vehicles. Further questions concerned driver behaviour, crash involvement, crash risk and crash mitigation.

    Truck drivers reported to drive 10.6 hours without break on average, with several drivers reporting that they had to drive 24 hours without rest. Around 40% of the trucks did not have any seat belts installed, with a larger share of older trucks lacking belts. Most of the drivers who had seat belts reported to use them, however. Almost 40% of the drivers reported to have been involved in at least one crash, and 45% of those drivers had experienced fatal crashes. This underlines that crashes counted per vehicle are very frequent, and the results are often severe, especially when heavy vehicles are involved.

    When asked what the three most common crash causes were, driver related causes were named frequently. Drivers were said to be reckless, further crash causes named often were drunkenness, inattention and sleepiness. One of the most mentioned crash mitigation strategies was driver education, but also improvement of the roads and the vehicles.

  • 14.
    Kyriakidis, Miltos
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology.
    de Winter, Joost C F
    Delft University of Technology.
    Stanton, Neville
    University of Southampton.
    Bellet, Thierry
    IFSTTAR.
    van Arem, Bart
    Delft University of Technology.
    Brookhuis, Karel A
    University of Groningen.
    Martens, Marieke H J
    University of Twente.
    Bengler, Klaus
    Technische Universitat Munchen.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Merat, Natasha
    University of Leeds.
    Reed, N.
    Transport Research Laboratory, UK.
    Flament, Maxime
    ERTICO - ITS Europe.
    Hagenzieker, Marjan
    Delft University of Technology.
    Happee, Riender
    Delft University of Technology.
    A human factors perspective on automated driving2017In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated driving can fundamentally change road transportation and improve quality of life. However, at present, the role of humans in automated vehicles (AVs) is not clearly established. Interviews were conducted in April and May 2015 with 12 expert researchers in the field of human factors (HFs) of automated driving to identify commonalities and distinctive perspectives regarding HF challenges in the development of AVs. The experts indicated that an AV up to SAE Level 4 should inform its driver about the AV's capabilities and operational status, and ensure safety while changing between automated and manual modes. HF research should particularly address interactions between AVs, human drivers and vulnerable road users. Additionally, driver-training programmes may have to be modified to ensure that humans are capable of using AVs. Finally, a reflection on the interviews is provided, showing discordance between the interviewees’ statements – which appear to be in line with a long history of HFs research – and the rapid development of automation technology. We expect our perspective to be instrumental for stakeholders involved in AV development and instructive to other parties.

  • 15.
    Levén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Pictures as cues or as support to verbal cues at encoding and execution of prospective memories in individuals with intellectual disability2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 141-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on prospective memory in persons with intellectual disability and age-matched controls. Persons with intellectual disability have limited prospective memory function. We investigated prospective memory with words and pictures as cues at encoding and retrieval. Prospective and episodic memory was estimated from Prospective Memory Game performance. Pictures at retrieval were important for prospective memory in particular in the intellectual disability group. Prospective memory performance imposed a cost to Episodic Memory (ongoing task) performance in the intellectual disability group. This group was outperformed by the control group on working memory, time reproduction, time concepts, and Raven's coloured progressive matrices. To conclude, pictures at retrieval improve prospective memory performance compared to words as cues. This can be essential for the intellectual disability group likely due to limited episodic and working memory capacity and the ability to switch attention.

  • 16.
    Nygårdhs, Sara
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Lundkvist, Sven-Olof
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    The effect of different delineator post configurations on driver speed in night-time traffic: A driving simulator study2014In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 72, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate how different delineator post configurations affect driver speed in night-time traffic. In addition, the potential speed effect of introducing a secondary task was investigated. The study was carried out in a car simulator on a road stretch including straight road sections as well as curves with different radii. Fourteen drivers participated in the study and the results show that absence of delineator posts leads to reduced speed. However, provided that there are delineator posts continuously present along the road, the overall driver speed is basically the same, regardless of the spacing between the delineator posts. The results also imply that to reduce driver speed in curves with small radius, using more compact spacing of posts in these curves as compared to in curves with a larger radius, could be a potential strategy. Additionally, the speed reducing effect of a secondary task was only prevailing where the task was initiated.

  • 17.
    Sandin, Jesper
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Renner, Linda
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    The effect on passenger cars’ meeting margins when overtaking 30 meter trucks on real roads.2012In: Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics 2012- 14 Volume Set: Proceedings of the 4th AHFE Conference 21-25 July 2012, Taylor & Francis, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to study the effect of vehicle length on meeting margins during overtaking maneuvers. A field study video-recorded overtaking maneuvers of a 30 m and a 24 m truck on a two-lane road. The difference in average meeting margins between the trucks was not statistically significant. An ocular assessment of the video material revealed a few critical situations during the overtaking maneuvers of the 30 m truck; all with meeting margins less than 3 s. Although these results should be interpreted with great caution as the number of analyzed overtaking maneuvers was limited, two previous studies describe similar findings. The conflict technique is discussed as a tool in the assessment of critical meeting margins. It is concluded that more field studies and data are needed to estimate the risks when overtaking Longer Combination Vehicles.

  • 18.
    Stave, Christina
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Cykelturism: en litteratursammanställning och omvärldsanalys2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study begins with surveys, investigations and pronounced strategies, followed by a discussion on certification of cycle guides. The second part relates to different research areas:

    • infrastructure, transport, safety and measurement
    • bicycle tourism economy and entrepreneurship
    • travelers’ demands, attitudes and behavior
    • bicycle tourism for health and well-being
    • bicycle tourism for training and sports
    • bicycle tourism sustainability

    Finally, a geographical orientation on bicycle tourism in Sweden and other countries. The results showed a number of practical needs that are listed in the report and the following examples of research needs: Development of measurement and evaluation methods for specific destinations, higher quality of studies on bicycle tourism, qualitative as well as quantitative approaches, financing of studies with research objectives, access to statistics specifically for bicycle tourism, mapping of different groups of cyclists' needs, bicycle tourism and social sustainability, health effects (physical and psychological) of bicycle tourism, behavioral change for increased cycling through leisure cycling, cycling tourism and environmental awareness in transport to/from destinations, and finally more English-language literature.

  • 19.
    Wehtje, Philip
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Niska, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Infrastructure, Infrastructure maintenance.
    Effektsamband mellan infrastruktur och cykling: en kunskapssammanställning2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to consolidate existing knowledge of the relationships between infrastructure measures and a) number of accidents and b) number of cyclists. Another purpose was to consolidate knowledge regarding the secondary effects that increased cycling can provide. The secondary effects that will be investigated in this project are health effects and economic effects.

    Compilation of knowledge through literature studies and telephone interviews with 16 of the 26 municipalities that are members of the association Swedish Cycling Cities (Svenska Cykelstäder) and who participated in a previous study called “Cykeleffekt-del1”.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf