Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Karemyr, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System.
    Pettersson, Tommy
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Infrastructure, Crash safety.
    Svensson, Mats
    Chalmers University, Sweden.
    Linder, Astrid
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System. Chalmers University, Sweden.
    Seat Evaluation Tools (SETs): Development of prototype concepts of the SETs of an average female and male for low severity rear impact crash testing2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to develop new Seat Evaluation Tools (SET)s with the geometries of an average female (50F) and male (50M) as seated car occupants, based on data from humanshape.org. The SETs have been designed to evaluate the occupant protection performances of car seats in a low severity rear impact.

    Focus areas have been the motion of the spine, neck and shoulders to enable a human-like interaction with the car seat. Improvements have been made to previous designs of the neck spring and damper system, and a new solution for shoulder flexibility has been implemented. Soft body materials have been used to facilitate the motion of the torso, and a 3D thoracic and lumbar spine design has been developed.

    Two physical prototypes, SET v0.1 50F and 50M, have been developed and all drawings and CAD models have been made available under open-source license on the OpenVT platform (https://openvt.eu/). The prototypes have been run in initial dynamic tests and the results have been compared to previous volunteer tests.

    This work was carried out within the EU-funded project, VIRTUAL.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Klug, Corina
    et al.
    Vehicle Safety Institute, Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Bützer, David
    AXA Versicherungen AG, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Iraeus, Johan
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    John, Jobin
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Keller, Arne
    AGU, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Kowalik, Michal
    FAURECIA Automotive Seating, Grójec, Poland.
    Leo, Christoph
    Vehicle Safety Institute, Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Levallois, Ines
    FAURECIA Automotive Seating, Etampes, France.
    Putra, I. Putu A.
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ressi, Felix
    Vehicle Safety Institute, Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Schmitt, Kai-Uwe
    AGU, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Svensson, Mats
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Trummler, Linus
    AGU, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Wijnen, Wim
    W2Economics, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Linder, Astrid
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System.
    How much does the injury risk between average female and average male anthropometry differ?: A simulation study with open source tools for virtual crash safety assessments2023In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 193, article id 107328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in injury risk between females and males are often reported in field data analysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in kinematics and injury risks between average female and male anthropometry in two exemplary use cases. A simulation study comprising the newly introduced VIVA+ human body models (HBM) was performed for two use cases. The first use case relates to whiplash associated disorders sustained in rear impacts and the second to femur fractures in pedestrians impacted by passenger cars as field data indicates that females have higher injury risk compared to males in these scenarios.

    Detailed seat models and a generic vehicle exterior were used to simulate crash scenarios close to those currently tested in consumer information tests. In the evaluations with one of the vehicle seats and one car shape the injury risks were equal for both models. However, the risk of the average female HBM for whiplash associated disorders was 1.5 times higher compared to the average male HBM for the rear impacts in the other seat and 10 times higher for proximal femur fractures in the pedestrian impacts for one of the two evaluated vehicle shapes..

    Further work is needed to fully understand trends observed in the field and to derive appropriate countermeasures, which can be performed with the open source tools introduced in the current study.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Linder, Astrid
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System. Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heinzl, Philipp
    Siemens Mobility, Vienna, Austria.
    Iraeus, Johan
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    John, Jobin D.
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Keller, Arne
    Faurecia Automotive Seating, Brières-les-Scellés, France.
    Klug, Corina
    Vehicle Safety Institute, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria.
    Lackner, Christian
    Siemens Mobility, Vienna, Austria.
    Levallois, Ines
    Faurecia Automotive Seating, Brières-les-Scellés, France.
    Svensson, Mats
    Vehicle Safety Division, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schmitt, Kai-Uwe
    Faurecia Automotive Seating, Brières-les-Scellés, France.
    Trummler, Linus
    Faurecia Automotive Seating, Brières-les-Scellés, France.
    Xu, Jia Cheng
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System.
    Open-Source Tools for Road User Safety Abessment from the VIRTUAL Project2023In: TRA Lisbon 2022 Conference Proceedings Transport Research Arena / [ed] Luís de Picado Santos; Jorge Pinho de Sousa; Elisabete Arsenio, Elsevier, 2023, Vol. 72, p. 423-430Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the abessment of road user and vehicle occupant safety, physical testing is limited to a few scenarios. Virtual testing (VT) offers an opportunity to advance transport safety by introducing additional test cases. The objective of the VIRTUAL project is to provide tools such as finite element models, guidelines and a corresponding platform to foster the uptake of VT. A VT platform, OpenVT, has been established and provides open-source human body models (HBMs) of both an average female and male, seated and standing, as well as a seat, generic vehicle and tram front models. The tool chain from virtual to physical testing has been illustrated in the low severity impact case where the seat evaluation tool was developed. The newly established organisation OVTO will run the OpenVT platform in the future and govern the evolution of the results of the VIRTUAL project after its completion.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Linder, Astrid
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System.
    Hjort, Mattias
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle Systems and Driving Simulation..
    Svensson, Mats
    Vehicle Safety, Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Chalmers, Sweden.
    Dummy Kinematics Assessment: Evaluation of a Combined Gyro and Accelerometer Set-up2023In: 2023 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings, International Research Council on Biomechanics of Injury (IRCOBI) , 2023, p. 230-231, article id IRC-23-31Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Crash test dummy kinematics is commonly obtained from high-speed video recordings or other opticalmethods. The present study evaluates a cost-efficient sensor system combining gyros and accelerometers toderive the kinematics of different parts of a dummy. This evaluation was done on the newly designed humansurrogates, the Seat Evaluation Tools (SET) 50F and 50M, developed for low severity rear impacts and hereequipped with gyros at four locations

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Putra, I. Putu A.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Iraeus, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Thomson, Robert
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Svensson, Mats Y.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Linder, Astrid
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic Safety and Traffic System. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Sato, Fusako
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Comparison of control strategies for the cervical muscles of an average female head-neck finite element model2019In: Traffic Injury Prevention, ISSN 1538-9588, E-ISSN 1538-957X, Vol. 20, no S2, p. S116-S122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: ViVA OpenHBM is the first open source Human Body Model (HBM) for crash safety assessment. It represents an average size (50th percentile) female and was created to assess whiplash protection systems in a car. To increase the biofidelity of the current model, further enhancements are being made by implementing muscle reflex response capabilities as cervical muscles alter the head and neck kinematics of the occupant during low-speed rear crashes. The objective of this study was to assess how different neck muscle activation control strategies affect head-neck kinematics in low speed rear impacts.

    Methods: The VIVA OpenHBM head-neck model, previously validated to PMHS data, was used for this study. To represent the 34 cervical muscles, 129 beam elements with Hill-type material models were used. Two different muscle activation control strategies were implemented: a control strategy to mimic neural feedback from the vestibular system and a control strategy to represent displacement feedback from muscle spindles. To identify control gain values for these controller strategies, parameter calibrations were conducted using optimization. The objective of these optimizations was to match the head linear and angular displacements measured in volunteer tests.

    Results: Muscle activation changed the head kinematics by reducing the peak linear displacements, as compared to the model without muscle activation. For the muscle activation model mimicking the human vestibular system, a good agreement was observed for the horizontal head translation. However, in the vertical direction there was a discrepancy of head kinematic response caused by buckling of the cervical spine. In the model with a control strategy that represents muscle spindle feedback, improvements in translational head kinematics were observed and less cervical spine buckling was observed. Although, the overall kinematic responses were better in the first strategy.

    Conclusions: Both muscle control strategies improved the head kinematics compared to the passive model and comparable to the volunteer kinematics responses with overall better agreement achieved by the model with active muscles mimicking the human vestibular system.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf