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  • 1.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Dead or alive? Testing the use of C:N ratios and chlorophyll fluorescence in vertical shoot profiles to determine depth of vitality and point of senescence in populations of bryophytes2015In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 38, p. 4-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bryophytes with indeterminate growth rarely exhibit clearly identifiable modules or age segments, but can be vertically divided into different physiologically active zones, since physiological activity normally declines vertically along the shoot profile depth. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to use C:N ratios (C/N)and/or parameters from chlorophyll fluorescence measurements (e.g. Fv/Fm, Fm or qN)to determine if bryophyte tissue is alive, senescent or dead, and at what distance along the shoot segment profile the moss tissue cease to live. Variation in C:N ratios and chlorophyll fluorescence between sites was also examined. This study shows that it is possible to separate alive, senescing and dead parts of the moss shoots in Pleurozium schreberi, and that chlorophyll fluorescence is a good method to use, whereas C/N varies between sites and species (for Hylcomium splendens and Racomitrium lanuginosum)and does not seem to reflect physiological activity to the same degree.

  • 2.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    Hokkaido University.
    Effects of an in situ temperature increase on the short-term growth of arctic-alpine bryophytes2007In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 82-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the short-term growth responses to a temperature increase in situ of three bryophytes species of different genera. Temperatures were enhanced by the use of open-top chambers at Latnjajaure, a subarctic-alpine site in northernmost Sweden. Growth was measured during the growing season of 1995, using the tied-thread method for Aulacomnium turgidum, the cranked-wire method for Sphagnum teres, and the shoot-transplanting method for Tomentypnum nitens. Temperature enhancement significantly increased the growth in length of Sphagnum teres while no significant effects were found for the other two species. One possible reason for this is that Sphagnum teres had more water available, while the other two species could not respond to increased temperature due to constraints of water availability. Copyright © Lindbergia 2007.

  • 3.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    et al.
    Göteborg University.
    During, Heinjo J
    Utrecht University.
    Effects of simulated shade on growth, number of branches and biomass in Hylocomium splendens and Racomitrium lanuginosum2005In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of simulated shade in terms of reduced light quantity (PPFD) and changed red:far-red ratio (R:FR ratio) on the growth in length, in number of branches and in biomass, were examined in a greenhouse experiment with Hylocomium splendens and Racomitrium lanuginosum, two species from habitats with different light conditions (with H. splendens often in more shaded microsites). Using ten intact moss turfs per species which had been collected on Iceland at 4 m distance between replicate turfs, we tested, whether light quantity affected growth and biomass, whether changes in light quantity and red:far-red ratio affected the number of branches, and whether the two species differed in these responses. Reduced light quantity (i.e. PPFD level) caused a greater length increase, decreased biomass, and biomass:length ratio in both species, but the magnitude of response varied greatly between species. Furthermore, in R. lanuginosum spectral shade (i.e. reduced PPFD and a lower R:FR ratio) generally caused stronger responses than neutral shade, with only a reduction in PPFD. H. splendens (from the shaded habitat) responded less strongly to the shade treatments than R. lanuginosum (from the open habitat) did. In addition to these effects of shading, there were strong effects of the turf of origin in both species, and in many cases the interaction between turf of origin and shading treatment was significant as well. Copyright © Lindbergia 2006.

  • 4.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    et al.
    Göteborg University.
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg S
    Univ. Centre in Svalbard.
    Økland, Rune H
    Dept. of Botany, Natural History Museum, Univ. of Oslo.
    Phenotypic variation at different spatial scales in relation to environment in two circumpolar bryophyte species2005In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 125-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphology, physiology and biomass in two widespread bryophyte species, Hylocomium splendens and Racomitrium lanuginosum, were studied to examine the extent to which different species exhibit similar phenotypic variation patterns within and across regions. Analyses of nine morphological variables, chlorophyll content, nitrogen content, C/N ratio and biomass were conducted in samples from five sites in two geographically separated and climatically different regions, Iceland and northern Sweden. Both species exhibited large between-site variation in morphology, physiology and biomass, but within-site variation in morphology was substantially higher in Hylocomium splendens than Racomitrium lanuginosum. Morphological patterns were partly similar, partly different between the species, indicating that the two species respond morphologically to external factors on different scales. The lowest concentrations of chlorophyll and nitrogen were found at the same sites for both species, while the site of highest concentration was not the same. In Hylocomium splendens, chlorophyll content was positively correlated with biomass. Many of the observed relationships between morphological, physiological variables and biomass were species-specific. Our results demonstrate that the two bryophytes exhibit different phenotypic responses to environmental variation. Copyright © Lindbergia 2006.

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