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  • 1. Agustsson, Larus
    Automatic speed control: The Danish pilot project2001In: Proceedings of the conference Traffic Safety on Three Continents: International conference in Moscow, Russia, 19-21 September, 2001 / [ed] Asp, Kenneth, Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2001, Vol. 18A:2, p. 7-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the new Danish Road Safety Action Plan is to reduce the number of traffic accident fatalities and serious casualties by 40% from 1998 to the year 2012. This plan is ambitiously titled "Each Accident is One Too Many". The four main areas of the accident plan are accidents caused by speeding, accidents caused by intoxicated drivers, accidents with bicyclists, and accidents at intersections. This paper deals with the first type of accident in the plan - accidents caused by speeding. Specifically, the paper describes the automatic speed control pilot project in Denmark.

  • 2.
    Aramrattana, Maytheewat
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driving Simulation and Visualization. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Modelling and Simulation for Evaluation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport System Functions2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Future vehicles are expected to be equipped with wireless communication technology, that enables them to be “connected” to each others and road infrastructures. Complementing current autonomous vehicles and automated driving systems, the wireless communication allows the vehicles to interact, cooperate, and be aware of its surroundings beyond their own sensors’ range. Such sys- tems are often referred to as Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS), which aims to provide extra safety, efficiency, and sustainability to transporta- tion systems. Several C-ITS applications are under development and will require thorough testing and evaluation before their deployment in the real-world. C- ITS depend on several sub-systems, which increase their complexity, and makes them difficult to evaluate.

    Simulations are often used to evaluate many different automotive applications, including C-ITS. Although they have been used extensively, simulation tools dedicated to determine all aspects of C-ITS are rare, especially human factors aspects, which are often ignored. The majority of the simulation tools for C-ITS rely heavily on different combinations of network and traffic simulators. The human factors issues have been covered in only a few C-ITS simulation tools, that involve a driving simulator. Therefore, in this thesis, a C-ITS simulation framework that combines driving, network, and traffic simulators is presented. The simulation framework is able to evaluate C-ITS applications from three perspectives; a) human driver; b) wireless communication; and c) traffic systems.

    Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and its applications are chosen as the first set of C-ITS functions to be evaluated. Example scenarios from CACC and platoon merging applications are presented, and used as test cases for the simulation framework, as well as to elaborate potential usages of it. Moreover, approaches, results, and challenges from composing the simulation framework are presented and discussed. The results shows the usefulness of the proposed simulation framework.

    List of papers
    1. Dimensions of cooperative driving, ITS and automation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dimensions of cooperative driving, ITS and automation
    2015 (English)In: IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, Proceedings, 2015, p. 144-149Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless technology supporting vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication, allow vehicles and infrastructures to exchange information, and cooperate. Cooperation among the actors in an intelligent transport system (ITS) can introduce several benefits, for instance, increase safety, comfort, efficiency.

    Automation has also evolved in vehicle control and active safety functions. Combining cooperation and automation would enable more advanced functions such as automated highway merge and negotiating right-of-way in a cooperative intersection. However, the combination have influences on the structure of the overall transport systems as well as on its behaviour. In order to provide a common understanding of such systems, this paper presents an analysis of cooperative ITS (C-ITS) with regard to dimensions of cooperation. It also presents possible influence on driving behaviour and challenges in deployment and automation of C-ITS.

    Keywords
    Electronics, Software, Automation, Vehicle, Autonomous vehicle, Safety, Behaviour
    National Category
    Transport Systems and Logistics
    Research subject
    90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 914 Road: ITS och vehicle technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-9271 (URN)10.1109/IVS.2015.7225677 (DOI)2-s2.0-84951010000 (Scopus ID)9781467372664 (ISBN)
    Conference
    IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, IV 2015, 28 June 2015 through 1 July 2015
    Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Extended Driving Simulator for Evaluation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extended Driving Simulator for Evaluation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 annual ACM Conference on SIGSIM Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation (SIGSIM-PADS '16), New York, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 255-258Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicles in cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) often need to interact with each other in order to achieve their goals, safe and efficient transport services. Since human drivers are still expected to be involved in C-ITS, driving simulators are appropriate tools for evaluation of the C-ITS functions. However, driving simulators often simplify the interactions or influences from the ego vehicle on the traffic. Moreover, they normally do not support vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication, which is the main enabler for C-ITS. Therefore, to increase the C-ITS evaluation capability, a solution on how to extend a driving simulator with traffic and network simulators to handle cooperative systems is presented as a result of this paper. Evaluation of the result using two use cases is presented. And, the observed limitations and challenges of the solution are reported and discussed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016
    Keywords
    Simulator (driving), Cooperative intelligent transport system, Technology, Development, Network (traffic)
    National Category
    Vehicle Engineering
    Research subject
    90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 914 Road: ITS och vehicle technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-10736 (URN)10.1145/2901378.2901397 (DOI)978-1-4503-3742-7 (ISBN)
    Conference
    2016 annual ACM Conference on SIGSIM Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation (SIGSIM-PADS '16)
    Projects
    VICTIgSAFER-VICTIg
    Funder
    Knowledge Foundation
    Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
    3. Cooperative Driving Simulation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperative Driving Simulation
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Driving Simulation Conference 2016, 2016, p. 123-132Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a few decades, driving simulators have been supporting research and development of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). In the near future, connected vehicles are expected to be deployed. Driving simulators will need to support evaluation of cooperative driving applications within cooperative intelligent transportation systems (C-ITS) scenarios. C-ITS utilize vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication. Simulation of the inter vehicle communication is often not supported in driving simulators. On the other hand, previous efforts have been made to connect network simulators and traffic simulators, to perform C-ITS simulations. Nevertheless, interactions between actors in the system is an essential aspect of C-ITS. Driving simulators can provide the opportunity to study interactions and reactions of human drivers to the system. This paper present simulation of a C-ITS scenario using a combination of driving, network, and traffic simulators. The architecture of the solution and important challenges of the integration are presented. A scenario from Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) 2016 is implemented in the simulator as an example use case. Lastly, potential usages and future developments are discussed.

    Keywords
    Intelligent transport system, Platooning (electronic), Simulator (driving), Simulation, Traffic, Network (traffic)
    National Category
    Computer Systems Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
    Research subject
    20 Road: Traffic engineering, 23 Road: ITS och traffic; 80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 84 Road: Road users
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-12688 (URN)
    Conference
    DSC 2016 Europe, Driving Simulation and Virtual Reality Conference and Exhibition, 7-9 sept, 2016, Paris, France
    Funder
    Knowledge Foundation
    Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Aramrattana, Maytheewat
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driving Simulation and Visualization. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Larsson, Tony
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Jansson, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Nåbo, Arne
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driving Simulation and Visualization.
    A simulation framework for cooperative intelligent transport systems testing and evaluation2017In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connected and automated driving in the context of cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) is an emerging area in transport systems research. Interaction and cooperation between actors in transport systems are now enabled by the connectivity by means of vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication. To ensure the goals of C-ITS, which are safer and more efficient transport systems, testing and evaluation are required before deployment of C-ITS applications. Therefore, this paper presents a simulation framework—consisting of driving-, traffic-, and network-simulators—for testing and evaluation of C-ITS applications. Examples of cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) applications are presented, and are used as test cases for the simulation framework as well as to elaborate on potential use cases of it. Challenges from combining the simulators into one framework, and limitations are reported and discussed. Finally, the paper concludes with future development directions, and applications of the simulation framework in testing and evaluation of C-ITS. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Aramrattana, Maytheewat
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driving Simulation and Visualization. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Larsson, Tony
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Jansson, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users.
    Nåbo, Arne
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driving Simulation and Visualization.
    Cooperative Driving Simulation2016In: Proceedings of the Driving Simulation Conference 2016, 2016, p. 123-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a few decades, driving simulators have been supporting research and development of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). In the near future, connected vehicles are expected to be deployed. Driving simulators will need to support evaluation of cooperative driving applications within cooperative intelligent transportation systems (C-ITS) scenarios. C-ITS utilize vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication. Simulation of the inter vehicle communication is often not supported in driving simulators. On the other hand, previous efforts have been made to connect network simulators and traffic simulators, to perform C-ITS simulations. Nevertheless, interactions between actors in the system is an essential aspect of C-ITS. Driving simulators can provide the opportunity to study interactions and reactions of human drivers to the system. This paper present simulation of a C-ITS scenario using a combination of driving, network, and traffic simulators. The architecture of the solution and important challenges of the integration are presented. A scenario from Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) 2016 is implemented in the simulator as an example use case. Lastly, potential usages and future developments are discussed.

  • 5.
    Asp, Kenneth
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Hur kommer datatekniken att påverka de framtida vägtransporterna: Rapportsammanställning från ett seminarium vid VTI 1982-06-021982Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Olstam, Johan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Traffic analysis and logistics. Linköpings universitet, Kommunikations- och transportsystem.
    Generation and simulation of surrounding vehicles in a driving simulator2006In: DSC 2006 Europe, 2006, p. 176-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving simulators are used to conduct experiments on driver behavior, road design, and vehicle characteristics, etc. It is important that a driving simulator include a realistic simulation of surrounding vehicles in order to be a valid representation of real driving. This paper describes a model that generates and simulates surrounding traffic for a driving simulator. The model is built on established techniques for time-driven micro-simulation of traffic. The model only considers the closest neighborhood of the driving simulator vehicle. This neighborhood is divided into one inner region and two outer regions. Vehicles in the inner region are simulated according to advanced behavioral models while vehicles in the outer regions are updated according to a less time-consuming mesoscopic model. The sub-models for driving behavior are enhanced versions of the sub-models in the HUTSIM/TPMA model and the VTISim model. The developed simulation model also includes a new sub-model for the behavior during overtakings. The developed model has been tested within the VTI Driving simulator III. A driving simulator experiment has been performed in order to check if the participants observe the behavior of the simulated vehicles as realistic or not. The results were promising but they also indicated that enhancements could be made. The model has also been validated on the number of vehicles that catches up with the driving simulator vehicle and vice versa. The agreement is good for active and passive catch-ups on rural roads and for passive catch-ups on freeways, but less good for active catch-ups on freeways.

1 - 6 of 6
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