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Truck drivers' opinion on road safety in Tanzania: A questionnaire study
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1849-9722
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
2012 (English)In: Traffic Injury Prevention, ISSN 1538-9588, E-ISSN 1538-957X, Vol. 14, no 1, 103-111 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even though the traffic fatality risk (fatalities per 100 000 inhabitants) in Tanzania is quite low, the fatality rate (fatalities per 10 000 vehicles) is one of the highest in the world. Since vehicle density will increase it is important to implement measures to increase traffic safety.

Within the EU project ASSET-Road a questionnaire study on road safety was conducted with 250 truck drivers in Tanzania. The drivers were interviewed in three different towns in southern Tanzania, and participation was voluntary. The questionnaire treated demographics, the state of the drivers' vehicles, the frequency of breakdowns and the maintenance of the vehicles. Further questions concerned driver behaviour, crash involvement, crash risk and crash mitigation.

Truck drivers reported to drive 10.6 hours without break on average, with several drivers reporting that they had to drive 24 hours without rest. Around 40% of the trucks did not have any seat belts installed, with a larger share of older trucks lacking belts. Most of the drivers who had seat belts reported to use them, however. Almost 40% of the drivers reported to have been involved in at least one crash, and 45% of those drivers had experienced fatal crashes. This underlines that crashes counted per vehicle are very frequent, and the results are often severe, especially when heavy vehicles are involved.

When asked what the three most common crash causes were, driver related causes were named frequently. Drivers were said to be reckless, further crash causes named often were drunkenness, inattention and sleepiness. One of the most mentioned crash mitigation strategies was driver education, but also improvement of the roads and the vehicles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2012. Vol. 14, no 1, 103-111 p.
Keyword [en]
Lorry, Driver, Interview, Accident, Cause, Safety, Behaviour, Tanzania
National Category
Vehicle Engineering Applied Psychology
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour; 80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 81 Road: Accidents
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-7900DOI: 10.1080/15389588.2012.671982ISI: 000316909600014ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84871856983OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-7900DiVA: diva2:814908
Available from: 2015-05-28 Created: 2015-05-28 Last updated: 2016-08-31Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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