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Effects of electronic billboards on driver distraction.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4134-0303
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.
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2013 (English)In: Traffic Injury Prevention, ISSN 1538-9588, Vol. 14, no 5, 469-76 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: There is an increase in electronic advertising billboards along major roads, which may cause driver distraction due to the highly conspicuous design of the electronic billboards. Yet limited research on the impact of electronic billboards on driving performance and driver behavior is available. The Swedish Transport Administration recently approved the installation of 12 electronic billboards for a trial period along a 3-lane motorway with heavy traffic running through central Stockholm, Sweden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these electronic billboards on visual behavior and driving performance.

METHOD: A total of 41 drivers were recruited to drive an instrumented vehicle passing 4 of the electronic billboards during day and night conditions. A driver was considered visually distracted when looking at a billboard continuously for more than 2 s or if the driver looked away from the road for a high percentage of time. Dependent variables were eye-tracking measures and driving performance measures.

RESULTS: The visual behavior data showed that drivers had a significantly longer dwell time, a greater number of fixations, and longer maximum fixation duration when driving past an electronic billboard compared to other signs on the same road stretches. No differences were found for the factors day/night, and no effect was found for the driving behavior data.

CONCLUSION: Electronic billboards have an effect on gaze behavior by attracting more and longer glances than regular traffic signs. Whether the electronic billboards attract too much attention and constitute a traffic safety hazard cannot be answered conclusively based on the present data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 14, no 5, 469-76 p.
Keyword [en]
Behaviour, Driver, Distraction, Eye movement, Accident prevention, Attention
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Road: Traffic safety and accidents, Road: Road user behaviour
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-7127DOI: 10.1080/15389588.2012.731546ISI: 000320018700004PubMedID: 23682577Scopus ID: s2.0-84878812629OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-7127DiVA: diva2:748021
Available from: 2014-09-18 Created: 2014-09-18 Last updated: 2017-02-22Bibliographically approved

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Dukic, TaniaAhlström, ChristerPatten, ChristopherKircher, Katja
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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