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Car drivers’ perceptions of electronic stability control (ESC) systems
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic safety, society and road-user.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9164-9221
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Infrastructure, Infrastructure maintenance.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.
2011 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 43, no 3, 706-713 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a way to reduce the number of car crashes different in-car safety devices are being introduced. In this paper one such application is being investigated, namely the electronic stability control system (ESC). The study used a survey method, including 2000 private car drivers (1000 driving a car with ESC and 1000 driving a car without ESC). The main objective was to investigate the effect of ESC on driver behaviour. Results show that drivers report that they drive even more carelessly when they believe that they have ESC, than when they do not. Men are more risk prone than women and young drivers more than older drivers. Using the theory of planned behaviour the results show that attitude, subjective norm and perceived control explain between 62% and 67% of driver’s variation of intentions to take risks. When descriptive norm was added to the model a small but statistically significant increase was found. The study also shows that more than 35% erroneously believe that their car is equipped with an ESC system. These findings may suggest that driver behaviour could reduce the positive effect ESC has on accidents. It also shows that drivers who purchase a new car are not well informed about what kind of safety devices the car is equipped with. These findings highlight the need for more targeted information to drivers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 43, no 3, 706-713 p.
Keyword [en]
Electronic stability program, Driver, Behaviour, Risk, Knowledge
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour; 90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 911 Road: Components of the vehicle
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-7113DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2010.10.015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-7113DiVA: diva2:747557
Available from: 2014-09-17 Created: 2014-09-16 Last updated: 2016-02-22Bibliographically approved

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Vadeby, AnnaWiklund, MatsForward, Sonja
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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