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Simulation of rural road traffic for driving simulators
Linköpings universitet, Kommunikations- och transportsystem.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0336-6943
2005 (English)In: Proceedings of the 84th Annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington D.C., USA, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Driving simulators are used to conduct experiments on driver behavior, road design, and vehicle characteristics, etc. The results of the experiments often depend on traffic conditions. One example is the evaluation of cellular phones and how they affect driving behavior. It is clear that the ability to use phones when driving depends on traffic intensity and composition, and that realistic experiments in driving simulators must therefore include surrounding traffic. This paper describes a model that generates and simulates surrounding rural road traffc for a driving simulator. The model generates a traffic stream, corresponding to a given target flow and simulates realistic interactions between vehicles. The model is built on established techniques for time-driven microsimulation of traffic. The model only considers the closest neighborhood of the driving simulator vehicle. This neighborhood is divided into one inner region and two outer regions. Vehicles in the inner region are simulated according to advanced behavioral models while vehicles in the outer regions are updated according to a less time-consuming model. The paper also discusses calibration and validation of the model and the problem of combining stochastic traffic and driving simulator scenarios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005.
Keyword [en]
Simulation, Simulator (driving), Micro, Model (not math)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Road: Traffic engineering, Road: Traffic theory
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-192OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-192DiVA: diva2:687680
Conference
Annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board
Available from: 2009-03-25 Created: 2013-10-16 Last updated: 2014-03-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Simulation of Surrounding Vehicles in Driving Simulators
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation of Surrounding Vehicles in Driving Simulators
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Driving simulators and microscopic traffic simulation are important tools for making evaluations of driving and traffic. A driving simulator is de-signed to imitate real driving and is used to conduct experiments on driver behavior. Traffic simulation is commonly used to evaluate the quality of service of different infrastructure designs. This thesis considers a different application of traffic simulation, namely the simulation of surrounding vehicles in driving simulators.

The surrounding traffic is one of several factors that influence a driver's mental load and ability to drive a vehicle. The representation of the surrounding vehicles in a driving simulator plays an important role in the striving to create an illusion of real driving. If the illusion of real driving is not good enough, there is an risk that drivers will behave differently than in real world driving, implying that the results and conclusions reached from simulations may not be transferable to real driving.

This thesis has two main objectives. The first objective is to develop a model for generating and simulating autonomous surrounding vehicles in a driving simulator. The approach used by the model developed is to only simulate the closest area of the driving simulator vehicle. This area is divided into one inner region and two outer regions. Vehicles in the inner region are simulated according to a microscopic model which includes sub-models for driving behavior, while vehicles in the outer regions are updated according to a less time-consuming mesoscopic model.

The second objective is to develop an algorithm for combining autonomous vehicles and controlled events. Driving simulators are often used to study situations that rarely occur in the real traffic system. In order to create the same situations for each subject, the behavior of the surrounding vehicles has traditionally been strictly controlled. This often leads to less realistic surrounding traffic. The algorithm developed makes it possible to use autonomous traffic between the predefined controlled situations, and thereby get both realistic traffc and controlled events. The model and the algorithm developed have been implemented and tested in the VTI driving simulator with promising results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009. 65 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1248
Keyword
Traffic, Micro, Simulation, Mode, Overtaking, Lane changing, Car following, Rural road, Mathematical model, Simulator, Thesis
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Road: Traffic engineering, Road: Traffic theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-191 (URN)978-91-7393-660-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-04-24, K3, Kåkenhus, Campus Norrköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-03-12 Created: 2013-10-16 Last updated: 2014-03-25Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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Output format
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