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Exploring Driver Behaviour Using Simulated Worlds
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Traffic analysis and logistics. Linköpings universitet, Kommunikations- och transportsystem.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9635-5233
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4790-7094
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), London, UK .
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), London, UK .
2011 (English)In: Infrastructure and Safety in a Collaborative World: Road Traffic Safety / [ed] E. Bekiaris, M. Wiethoff och E. Gaitanidou, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg , 2011, 1, 125-142 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter presents the background, along with some illustrated examples, of simulator applications for the needs of assessing novel systems and infrastructure interventions, in terms of enhancing the forgiving and self-explanatory nature of a road. The first two, “Active traffic management” and “Non-physical motorway segregation” are designed to ease congestion but also have implications for safety, the first leading towards a self-explanatory road environment (SER), whereas the second contributing towards a more forgiving road environment (FRE). The second two “Actively illuminated road studs” and “Psychological traffic calming” are FRE types of interventions, designed for rural roads specifically to improve safety, but these may also have unanticipated consequences. For example, delineation of a road at night by actively illuminated road studs offers the driver much greater visibility of the road ahead, but this could be exploited by drivers choosing to drive at higher speeds. Finally, the pilot testing of milled vs. “virtual” rumble strips as in-vehicle information is presented (another FRE measure), as tested within IN-SAFETY, following a testing methodology which brings together methods for collecting data on individual driver behaviour and traffic simulation, building upon the traffic safety related adaptations of microsimulation models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg , 2011, 1. 125-142 p.
Keyword [en]
Traffic, Simulation, Driver information, Evaluation, Driver assistance system, Congestion, Decrease
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-6561DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-18372-0_7ISBN: 978-3-642-18371-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-6561DiVA: diva2:676078
Available from: 2012-03-09 Created: 2013-12-05 Last updated: 2016-01-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf