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Driving speed relative to the speed limit and relative to the perception of safe, enjoyable, and economical speed
Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
2001 (English)In: Proceedings of the conference Traffic Safety on Three Continents: International conference in Moscow, Russia, 19-21 September, 2001 / [ed] Asp, Kenneth, Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2001, Vol. 18A:3, 8- p.Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Two hundred and twenty five drivers, who stopped at gas stations on the highway were interviewed about their perceptions of safe, enjoyable, economical, and actual driving speeds, as well as on their knowledge of the speed limit on the road they were driving. These evaluations were then compared to each other as well as to the posted speed limit. Each driver also rated himself/herself on three scales relative to being a safe, a considerate, and an aggressive driver. Regardless of the actual speed limit, drivers rated economical speed as being the lowest (92 km/hr), and enjoyable speed as being the highest (105 km/hr). The speed they drove with family in the car was similar to the perceived safe speed and economical speed. In contrast, the average reported actual speed (when driving alone) was significantly above the speed limit and close to the enjoyable speed. Thus it appears that drivers adjust their speed to be a little below the level that they desire (as being enjoyable). However, the level of adjustment is relatively small, indicating that neither safety nor savings are major determinants of speed choice. Other factors which correlated significantly with the perceptions of safe, economical, and enjoyable speeds were the posted legal speed limit (road service level), driver gender, and past record of moving traffic citations. All perceived/estimated speeds were higher on the roads with higher speed limits; men estimated higher speeds than women, and drivers with repeated citations estimated higher speeds than drivers with zero or one citation only in the past two years. This survey has implications for means of affecting speed choice by relying on factors to which drivers are already sensitive, such as safety, savings, and concern for others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2001. Vol. 18A:3, 8- p.
Series
VTI konferens, ISSN 1104-7267 ; 18A:3
Keyword [en]
Speed, Speed limit, Behaviour, Driver, Interview, Perception, male, Female, Risk taking
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 84 Road: Road users
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-5118OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-5118DiVA: diva2:673948
Conference
Traffic Safety on Three Continents: International conference in Moscow, Russia, 19-21 September, 2001
Available from: 2013-12-03 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2015-09-21Bibliographically approved

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http://vti.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:673699/FULLTEXT06.pdf
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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