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Comprehensive evaluation of an advance brake warning system
2001 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Three studies evaluated the potential risks and benefits of an advance brake

warning system . The system is based on a sensor attached to the accelerator

that sends a signal to the brake light whenever the accelerator is released

in a sudden manner (0.3 m/s - typical of emergency braking). The signal turns

the brake lights on for 1.0 second. If during that time the driver actually

brakes, then the following driver perceives a continuous brake light that

comes on approximately 0.2 s before the brakes are actually applied

(equivalent to the time it takes to move the foot from the accelerator pedal

to the brake pedal). If the driver does not brake, then the brake light goes

off within 1.0 s (essentially signalling a false alarm). The first study, a

field study, showed that the ABWS has a false alarm rate of 25% and that, in

general such emergency braking actions are relatively rare. The second study

evaluated the additional time that would be provided to the following driver

when the brake lights of the car ahead are activated by the ABWS. In a

laboratory study, subjects braked in a simulator in response to the onset of

the brake lights of the car ahead. The results showed that the critical

movement time from the accelerator to the brake pedal (i.e., the added time

that a following driver would have to respond) is approximately 0.2 s, and it

is not greatly influenced by the level of expectancy. The third study was a

computer-based Monte Carlo simulation that evaluated the likelihood of crash

prevention due to ABWS under different conditions of speed, road conditions,

and headway distances. The results showed that the ABWS should be very

effective whenever the headway is under 1.5 seconds. This was true especially

under dry road conditions, and regardless of the driving speed. The final

study was a fleet study with nearly 400 matched pairs of vehicles - with and

without the ABWS - that were tracked for an average of 3 years. The fleet

study failed to find a statistically significant benefit of the ABWS. In

conclusion, while the ABWS does not compromise safety, its benefits in real

world driving are sufficiently small that its incorporation into the vehicle

brake-communication system is questionable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut., VTI konferens , 2001.
Series
VTI konferens, ISSN 1104-7267
Keyword [en]
English, Sweden, Conference, South Africa, Brake light, Warning, Improvement, Time, Braking, Headway, Laboratory, Simulation, In Situ, Test
Research subject
Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, Road: Components of the vehicle
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-4940OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-4940DiVA: diva2:673769
Available from: 2013-12-03 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2013-12-03

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf