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Driving simulator-based training to improve self-rating ability of driving performance in older adults: a pilot study
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1816-9483
Sweco .ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4140-3490
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2301-5793
2019 (English)In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective The aim was to investigate the potential of using simulator-based training (SBT) to improve older drivers' self-rating ability and to compare two forms of feedback; corrective versus corrective and rewarding feedback.

Method The study was designed to study the possibility of training for self-rated driving ability in a simulator, and the impact of corrective (errors made) feedback versus corrective (errors made) and rewarding (correct behaviour) feedback during training. In total, 21 older drivers (mean age 78.5, SD=3.9 years) were trained and assessed in the driving simulator. Driving performance was assessed by penalty scores as well as self and expert ratings.

Results The average deviation from correctly rated ability (own vs. expert) changed from -0.7 (under-rating) to 0.1 at the final training and assessment occasion; i.e., drivers ratings became more like the expert's rating or, in other terms, better calibrated. The individuals with the largest deviations from the expert's rating initially improved their self-rating ability the most. There were no differences between the two feedback groups in terms of their ability to self-rate, but rewarding feedback had a positive effect on penalty scores. The SBT showed positive training effects on the ability to self-rate one's driving ability, and rewarding feedback contributed to lower penalty scores. However, simulator sickness was a shortcoming that needs to be adressed, and the optimal form of feedback should be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGEROPEN , 2019. Vol. 11, no 1, article id 35
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-14065DOI: 10.1186/s12544-019-0372-6ISI: 000474350400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85068566357OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-14065DiVA, id: diva2:1349387
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved

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Selander, HelenaStave, ChristinaDukic Willstrand, TaniaPeters, Björn

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