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How to apply gender equality goals in transport and infrastructure planning
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1577-8793
WSP.
2019 (English)In: Integrating Gender into Transport Planning: From One to Many Tracks / [ed] Christina Lindkvist Scholten, Tanja Joelsson, Palgrave Macmillan , 2019, p. 89-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Working systematically on gender mainstreaming in transport infrastructure entails implementing a gender perspective in all stages of decision-making, planning and execution. In light of the sustainability goals introduced through the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, this chapter presents a model of how to address gender mainstreaming in transport planning in a more systematic way. Previous research has addressed the gender-equality goals in Sweden; now, we suggest how to explore the model in an international context. Our research is influenced by the fields of social impact assessment (SIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA), which we have combined into a model for integrating gender equality into transport planning. We call it gender impact assessment (GIA). The model has been developed over ten years of research into how gender-equality goals are implemented in transport planning. The model is objectives-led, goal-oriented, and adapted to planning practice.

We argue that an objectives-led approach to GIA could further develop transport planning with regard to gender mainstreaming. First, this approach to GIA could improve the outcomes of transport planning and second, this model of GIA would provide an assessment of whether or not various strategic actions are moving in the desired direction. This means that transport planners would be able to evaluate the fulfilment of the 2030 Agenda goals or national gender-equality goals. Third, GIA would establish assessment criteria to be used for testing the effects on gender equality of strategic actions of transport plans. Fourth and finally, this approach to GIA also highlights potential goal conflicts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan , 2019. p. 89-118
Keywords [en]
Woman, Transport infrastructure, Planning, Transport, Decision process, Impact study, Method
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning, 11 Road: Personal transport
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13735DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-05042-9_5Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064362080ISBN: 9783030050429 (print)ISBN: 9783030050412 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-13735DiVA, id: diva2:1314713
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved

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Levin, Lena

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf