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Evaluation of eco-driving systems: A European analysis with scenarios and micro simulation
TNO.
University of Leeds.
TNO.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Traffic analysis and logistics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0336-6943
2018 (English)In: Case Studies on Transport Policy, ISSN 2213-624X, E-ISSN 2213-6258Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

In recent years, various field operational tests (FOTs) have been carried out in the EU to measure the real-world impacts of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). A challenge arising from these FOTs is to scale up from the very localised effects measured in the tests to a much wider set of socio-economic impacts, for the purposes of policy evaluation. This can involve: projecting future take-up of the systems; scaling up to a wider geographical area – in some cases the whole EU; and estimating a range of economic, social and environmental impacts into the future. This article describes the evaluation conducted in the European project ‘ecoDriver’, which developed and tested a range of driver support systems for cars and commercial vehicles. The systems aimed to reduce CO2 emissions and energy consumption by encouraging the adoption of green driving behaviour. A novel approach to evaluation was adopted, which used scenario-building and micro-simulation to help scale up the results from field tests to the EU-28 level over a 20 year period, leading to a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) from both a societal and a stakeholder perspective. This article describes the method developed and used for the evaluation, and the main results for eco-driving systems, focusing on novel aspects, lessons learned and implications for policy and research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2018.
Keywords [en]
Environment, Driver assistance system, Evaluation (assessment), Driver, Behaviour, Emission, Fuel consumption, Forecast, Europe, Micro, Simulation, Cost benefit analysis
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
20 Road: Traffic engineering, 23 Road: ITS och traffic
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13242DOI: 10.1016/j.cstp.2018.08.001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85051383948OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-13242DiVA, id: diva2:1247461
Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved

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Olstam, Johan

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf