Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pedestrian injuries due to collisions with cyclist Melbourne, Australia
Monash University, Australia.
Monash University, Australia.
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over the past decade in Melbourne the popularity of cycling has increased both as a mode of transport and a recreational activity, while at the same time walking has consistently been the most prevalent form of physical activity. Increasing levels of active transport use and physical activity are seen as important public health issues, particularly as the rate of urbanisation continues to grow throughout the world. In addition, increased urbanisation is resulting in a greater number of people living within urban areas and is resulting in cities that are becoming increasingly congested and constrained for space for additional transportation infrastructure.

In many Australian cities this is leading to difficulties accommodating vulnerable road users within the existing road reserve. In line with Safe System principles, it is recognised that cyclists cannot always safely interact with motor vehicle traffic, particularly in high speed road environments, such as arterial roads. In these environments where there is insufficient space for on-road cycling facilities, shared path facilities are often recommended. Shared path facilities provide segregation between cyclists and motor vehicle traffic, however they require pedestrians and cyclists to interact within the same space. Shared path facilities have been shown to reduce the risk of cyclist injuries, however there is a concern that the burden of injury may be transferred from cyclists to pedestrians when these facilities are installed. Similarly, evidence suggests that some adult cyclists, in Australia, choose to ride on footpaths, instead of riding on the road. In most Australian jurisdictions  this is against the law, where generally cyclist can typically only ride on the footpath if they are accompanying a child below the age of 12, despite there being limited evidence of injury risk associated with the behaviour.

This study, therefore, aims to quantify the incidence of pedestrian injuries resulting from collisions with cyclists in Victoria, Australia. Analyses of various Victorian data sources were undertaken to enhance our understanding of pedestrian injuries resulting from a collision with a cyclist. Two sources of data were accessed:

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2018.
Research subject
X RSXC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-12908OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-12908DiVA, id: diva2:1204012
Conference
18th International Conference Road Safety on Five Continents (RS5C 2018), Jeju Island, South Korea, May 16-18, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 29 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf