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A field experiment on the accuracy of visual assessment of winter road conditions
Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Japan.
Civil Engineering Research Institute for Cold Region, Japan.
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In cold regions, winter weather poses a significant hazard to road transportation. Snow and ice reduce pavement friction, and this can cause traffic delays and increase the risk of traffic accidents. For example, up to 23% of all accidents in the US can be considered winter related, and a study conducted in the US found that winter precipitation is associated with a 19% increase in traffic crashes and a 13% increase in injuries compared to dry conditions. A study conducted in Sweden found that road surface slipperiness was a factor in 50% of all accidents in winter. In Japan’s northernmost island of Hokkaido, skidding accidents account for 90% of the winter-type traffic accidents.

Although vehicles are widely equipped with technologies designed to improve driving stability under winter road conditions, such as the anti-lock braking system (ABS) and electronic stability control (ESC), and these technologies do contribute to reductions in winter accidents, drivers’ visual assessment of road surface conditions still remains a critical element of safe winter driving. Road administrators conduct winter maintenance operations to provide road surfaces that are safe for the driving public. Although various friction-measuring devices have been developed and utilized, a number of road administrators still use visual inspection to assess winter road conditions. However, this visual determination is thought to be problematic, because it is a subjective measure of road safety that can be easily affected by experience and visibility conditions. If drivers mistakenly determine a slippery surface as “not slippery”, there is a risk of skidding and subsequent accident from unexpected loss of traction.

This study investigated the accuracy of visual assessment of winter road conditions through comparative tests between visual determinations of winter road conditions and friction values.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2018.
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Research subject
X RSXC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-12894OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-12894DiVA, id: diva2:1203793
Conference
18th International Conference Road Safety on Five Continents (RS5C 2018), Jeju Island, South Korea, May 16-18, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved

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Infrastructure Engineering

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf