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An ecological study of road safety for children undertaking active travel in Melbourne, Australia
Monash University Accident Research Centre.
Monash University Accident Research Centre.
Monash University Accident Research Centre.
2018 (English)Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In Australia, the rates of childhood obesity are increasing, with estimates that 27.4 percent of children between the ages of 5 and 17 are now overweight or obese. Similar trends have been observed in other developed countries including the United States of America, Canada and New Zealand. Alongside the rise in childhood obesity, the levels of physical activity achieved by children is in decline, resulting in children living increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Globally, it is understood that there is a need to address this growing public health issue associated with childhood obesity and their increasingly sedentary lifestyles in order to minimise the burden of non-communicable diseases that develop later in life and are associated with childhood obesity.

Despite the many health benefits of increasing active travel by children, they are vulnerable road users and therefore at higher risk of injury while engaging in these travel modes. This paper presents an ecological study focusing on retrospective analysis of child (aged 5 to 17 years) walking and cycling trips and the incidence of police reported crashes and hospital reported injuries in Melbourne, Australia. Exposure measures were gathered through analysis of two recent household travel surveys conducted in Victoria, Australia. Results of the surveys are weighted to represent typical travel patterns in 2007 and 2012. The exposure measures considered in the analysis were population size, distance travelled, time spent travelling and number of trips per year. Data on the incidence of crashes involving child pedestrians and child cyclists were collected from the hospital and police datasets for the same time periods. Injury incidence rates (per population, per distance travelled, per time spent travelling and per trip) were calculated for the two data sources and the respective levels of injury severity. Comparisons were made between the two time periods to identify any changes in relative risk of active travel for children over the five year study period. Incidence rates were also compared across transportation modes, demographics, spatial and temporal variables, to identify subgroups with increased levels of risk

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2018.
Research subject
X RSXC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-12891OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-12891DiVA, id: diva2:1203769
Conference
18th International Conference Road Safety on Five Continents (RS5C 2018), Jeju Island, South Korea, May 16-18, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf