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Is partially automated driving a bad idea?: Observations from an on-road study
University of Southampton.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle. University of Southampton.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1549-1327
Jaguar Land Rover Research.
University of Southampton.
2018 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 68, p. 138-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The automation of longitudinal and lateral control has enabled drivers to become “hands and feet free” but they are required to remain in an active monitoring state with a requirement to resume manual control if required. This represents the single largest allocation of system function problem with vehicle automation as the literature suggests that humans are notoriously inefficient at completing prolonged monitoring tasks. To further explore whether partially automated driving solutions can appropriately support the driver in completing their new monitoring role, video observations were collected as part of an on-road study using a Tesla Model S being operated in Autopilot mode. A thematic analysis of video data suggests that drivers are not being properly supported in adhering to their new monitoring responsibilities and instead demonstrate behaviour indicative of complacency and over-trust. These attributes may encourage drivers to take more risks whilst out on the road. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2018. Vol. 68, p. 138-145
Keywords [en]
Autonomous driving, Observation, Driver, Attention, Performance (road user), Behaviour
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour; 90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 914 Road: ITS och vehicle technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-12695DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2017.11.010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85035324754OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-12695DiVA, id: diva2:1168782
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson, Alexander

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf