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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Berrezel, Y. A., Abdelbaki, C., Rouissat, B., Boumaaza, T. & Mourad, K. (2023). Decision support system for the management of water distribution networks a case study of Tourville, Algeria. Larhyss Journal, 2023(54), 7-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision support system for the management of water distribution networks a case study of Tourville, Algeria
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2023 (English)In: Larhyss Journal, ISSN 1112-3680, Vol. 2023, no 54, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The analysis of the current situation of water distribution networks (WDNs) is based on many alternatives that are technically feasible and implemented by decision makers. Taking the WDN of Tourville city as a case study, this paper combines a set of decision support systems (DSSs), including geographic information systems (GISs), multicriteria analysis and hydraulic simulation models, to establish a multicriteria decision-making aid method for the renovation and rehabilitation of water distribution networks. This combination creates an expert management system based on multicriteria decision making that strengthens the optimization of the management of water distribution networks in terms of renovation and rehabilitation. After dividing the water distribution network into three emergency levels, it was concluded that 26% of the network is in urgent need of rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Research Laboratory in Subterranean and Surface Hydraulics, University of Biskra, 2023
Keywords
Analytic Hierarchy Process, Geographic Information Systems, Management, Modeling, Multicriteria Analysis, Water Distribution Network
National Category
Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-19818 (URN)2-s2.0-85162947038 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-04 Created: 2023-08-04 Last updated: 2023-08-04Bibliographically approved
Mourad, K., Nordin, L. & Andersson-Sköld, Y. (2022). Assessing flooding and possible adaptation measures using remote sensing data and hydrological modeling in Sweden. Climate Risk Management, 38, Article ID 100464.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing flooding and possible adaptation measures using remote sensing data and hydrological modeling in Sweden
2022 (English)In: Climate Risk Management, E-ISSN 2212-0963, Vol. 38, article id 100464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently, Europe is experiencing more frequent and greater floods compared to the last 500 years due to climate change among other factors. This has increased the associated risks, especially in urban areas, which poses a great challenge to all stakeholders. To protect traffic networks from possible floods, this paper uses QGIS, remote sensing data, and HEC-HMS model to assess flooding events and possible adaptation measures. Two case studies have been taken; 1) a 60-mm rainstorm that occurred in 2012 on a main road in the Northern part of Sweden (NB)); and 2) a 35-mm rainstorm that occurred in 2019 in the Southern part of Gothenburg (GO). The resulting flood hydrographs show that the peak reached are 0.5 m3/s and 3.8 m3/s in GO and NB, respectively. To adapt to these flood events, four adaptation measures were assessed namely afforestation, permeable pavements & green roofs, multi-use detention basins and culvert installation considering food production, biodiversity, prosperity, and the environment. The study has shown that afforestation is an effective flood risk mitigation measure to handle both moderate and extreme rain events. Well-maintained permeable surfaces and green roofs are effective in reducing flooding due to moderate rainfall, but not in reducing the impacts of extreme rainfall events. Well-designed multi-functional detention basins are good flood protection measures, however, if they are not well-maintained, their efficiency may be reduced by up to 90 %. Culverts are effective for frequent and limited rain events but extreme rain events may even increase flood risk and thereby contribute to damaging the infrastructure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
National Category
Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-19212 (URN)10.1016/j.crm.2022.100464 (DOI)2-s2.0-85141526917 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-01 Created: 2022-12-01 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Bwambale, J. & Mourad, K. (2022). Modelling the impact of climate change on maize yield in Victoria Nile Sub-basin, Uganda. Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 15(1), Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling the impact of climate change on maize yield in Victoria Nile Sub-basin, Uganda
2022 (English)In: Arabian Journal of Geosciences, ISSN 1866-7511, E-ISSN 1866-7538, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Agriculture is the backbone of Uganda's economy, with about 24.9% contribution to the gross domestic product (GDP) as per the Uganda National Household Survey 2016/17. Agricultural productivity (yield per hectare) is still low due to the high dependence on rain-fed subsistence farming. Climate change is expected to further reduce the yield per hectare. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the potential impact of climate change on maize yield in the Victoria Nile Sub-basin using the AquaCrop model. It further assesses the possible adaptation measures to climate change. The Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 2-Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) data downloaded from the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) was used to simulate maize yield in the near future (2021-2040), mid future (2041-2070) and late future (2071-2099). Results show that maize yield is likely to reduce by as high as 1-10%, 2-42% and 1-39% in the near, mid and late futures, respectively, depending on the agro-ecological zone. This decline in maize yield can have a significant impact on regional food security as well as socio-economic well-being since maize is a staple crop. The study also shows that improving soil fertility has no significant impact on maize yield under climate change. However, a combined application of supplementary irrigation and shifting the planting dates is a promising strategy to maintain food security and socio-economic development. This study presents important findings and adaptation strategies that policymakers and other stakeholders such as farmers can implement to abate the effects of climate change on crop production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG, 2022
National Category
Agricultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17648 (URN)10.1007/s12517-021-09309-z (DOI)000734333700001 ()
Available from: 2022-01-13 Created: 2022-01-13 Last updated: 2022-03-22Bibliographically approved
Mourad, K. A. (2022). Post-conflict development, reviewing the water sector in Somalia. Environment, Development and Sustainability
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-conflict development, reviewing the water sector in Somalia
2022 (English)In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Somali post-conflict development faces many challenges that affect the sustainability of the water sector. This paper reviews and analyses the post-conflict development activities in the water sector through local communications and reviewing published materials and databases from international players in Somalia, funding agencies and financial tracking service. The paper has shown that there has been great attention and support given to the country during its post-conflict development. However, most of these initiatives and projects have focused on emerging issues such as tackling food security and water, sanitation and hygiene services. The paper also shows that the continuous funding of emerging issues in Somalia has reduced its long-term sustainability of the water sector and limited its national and long-term benefits but has increased corruption due to increase the gap between actors and local people. Therefore, new transparent cooperative initiatives are needed based on transparent involvement and coordination among donors, local authorities and implementers to improve and develop the water sector and the livelihood in Somalia through a solid water governance system. © 2021, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media B.V., 2022
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17693 (URN)10.1007/s10668-021-02096-3 (DOI)000737761600001 ()35002479 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122251957 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-24 Created: 2022-03-24 Last updated: 2022-03-24Bibliographically approved
Abdallah, C. K. & Mourad, K. (2021). Assessing the quality of water used for vegetable irrigation in Tamale Metropolis, Ghana. Scientific Reports, 11, Article ID 5314.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the quality of water used for vegetable irrigation in Tamale Metropolis, Ghana
2021 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, article id 5314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper assesses water quality that is used for vegetable irrigation in Tamale Metropolis, Ghana. A mixed-method of research design was employed in this study to collect and analyze the data based on survey instruments. The paper found that Escherichia coli (E. coli) that is usually used as an indicator of water contamination and heavy metals exist in all taken water samples. The mean concentrations of nutrients such as ammonia, nitrate, nitrite and phosphate were recorded as 0.022 mg/l to 5.98 mg/l for ammonia, 1.06 mg/l to 7.52 mg/l for nitrate, 0.031 mg/l to 0.056 mg/l for nitrate and 0.037 mg/l to 0.069 mg/l for phosphate. E. coli and Total Coliforms levels for Sanghani, Kamina and Waterworks from the laboratory analysis were recorded as 3.2x10(3) CFU 100 m/l and 5.5x10(2) CFU 100 m/l, 4.0x10(3) CFU 100 m/l and 1x10(2) CFU 100 m/l, and 2.1x10(3) CFU 100 m/l and 4.6x10(2) CFU 100 m/l respectively. To conclude, based on the measured parameters, water used for irrigation in the Tamale Metropolitan is polluted and may cause potential health risks. Therefore, farmers, traders and consumers need to apply further safety measures to make the vegetables safe.

National Category
Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17076 (URN)10.1038/s41598-021-84617-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85102209460 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-17 Created: 2021-09-17 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Ebitu, L., Avery, H., Mourad, K. & Enyetu, J. (2021). Citizen science for sustainable agriculture - A systematic literature review. Land use policy, 103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Citizen science for sustainable agriculture - A systematic literature review
2021 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Farmers as volunteers in research could potentially provide a rich resource for exploring sustainable agricultural research questions. To discern emerging patterns in citizen science-based studies on topics with relevance for sustainable agriculture and reveal salient challenges and opportunities for conducting such studies, we conducted a literature review of 27 articles from the period 2004-2019 of 250 publications screened from Google Scholar. These articles were thematically grouped under the topics: Soil health, climate adaptation, pest/pathogen monitoring, invasive species, inputs and outputs and pollination. Participants' characteristics, motivations, study design and project outcomes in the reviewed articles were summarized and discussed. Both observational and experimental studies were represented in the articles, while emerging trends point towards field experimentation and 'Large-N' trials by lay farmers. Crowdsourcing lends itself to projects where the main role of the public is local visual observations and reporting, such as in pest/pathogen monitoring. Challenges included methodological issues such as validation procedures, but above all motivation, recruitment, and retention of volunteers. Despite the importance of participatory approaches for deeper citizen involvement for sustainability transitions and for the quality of knowledge outcomes, the role of citizens was overall restricted to data collection. Several of the methodologies proposed would be difficult to implement in low-income countries, and relatively few studies pertained to agricultural concerns of the global South. To lend value to farmers' time, we recommend projects relevant to livelihoods, health issues or local farming problems, accompanied by well structured data feedback protocols, routing study results back to farmers.

National Category
Agricultural Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17067 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2021.105326 (DOI)000626473800007 ()2-s2.0-85100391355 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-17 Created: 2021-09-17 Last updated: 2021-09-27Bibliographically approved
Almasalmeh, O., Saleh, A. A. & Mourad, K. A. (2021). Soil erosion and sediment transport modelling using hydrological models and remote sensing techniques in Wadi Billi, Egypt. Modeling Earth Systems and Environment, 8(1), 1215-1226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soil erosion and sediment transport modelling using hydrological models and remote sensing techniques in Wadi Billi, Egypt
2021 (English)In: Modeling Earth Systems and Environment, ISSN 2363-6203, E-ISSN 2363-6211, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1215-1226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Modelling soil erosion and sediment transport are vital to assess the impact of the flash floods. However, limited research works have studied sediment transport, especially in Egypt. This paper employs the HEC-HMS lumped hydrological model to predict the sediment load due to the flood event of 9th March 2014 in Wadi Billi, Egypt. The Modified USLE model has been used to calculate the total upland erosion, while Laursen-Copeland has been used to simulate load streams' sediment transport potential. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been applied over Landsat 8 image captured on 20th February 2014 using ArcMap 10.5 to determine the vegetation cover based on its spectral footprint. The resulted sedigraph showed accumulation of more than five thousand tons of sediments at the Wadi's outlet. The results are crucial to design a suitable stormwater management system to protect the downstream urban area and to use flood water for groundwater recharge.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17079 (URN)10.1007/s40808-021-01144-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-09-17 Created: 2021-09-17 Last updated: 2022-03-22Bibliographically approved
Rajosoa, A. S., Abdelbaki, C. & Mourad, K. A. (2021). Water assessment in transboundary river basins: the case of the Medjerda River Basin. Sustainable Water Resources Management, 7(6), Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Water assessment in transboundary river basins: the case of the Medjerda River Basin
2021 (English)In: Sustainable Water Resources Management, ISSN 2363-5037, Vol. 7, no 6, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water resources in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA region) face over-exploitation and over-pollution due to population growth, climate change and the lack of advanced water governance approaches. These challenges become more serious in transboundary river basins and may lead to conflict between riparian countries. The main objective of this paper is to assess water resources and needs at the Medjerda River Basin (MRB), shared by Tunisia and Algeria using the Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) system between 2020 and 2050. Four scenarios were built to assess the current and future status of the water supply and demands in both countries. The results show that water demands, and shortages are increasing, and some demand sites will face real water scarcity in the future due to climate change and development practices. Therefore, new allocation and management plans should be examined at the regional level based on real collaboration among all stakeholders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH, 2021
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17331 (URN)10.1007/s40899-021-00566-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85117325431 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-03 Created: 2021-11-03 Last updated: 2022-03-22Bibliographically approved
Mourad, K. (2020). A water compact for sustainable water management. Sustainability, 12(18), Article ID 7339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A water compact for sustainable water management
2020 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 18, article id 7339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The water sector in Somalia is fragmented and needs coordination to establish a functioning water governance system. Therefore, commitments from all affected stakeholders are needed to support water resources development in Somalia. This paper proposed a water compact for Somalia that can address all water sector challenges to approach sustainability. The paper starts by analyzing water sector stakeholders in Somalia, describing their missions and relationship with the compact, categorizing all selected stakeholders based on their power and interest, and identifying key stakeholders. Based on the outcome from the national workshop and the literature, a water compact was proposed highlighting possible actions to solve the identified challenges. The compact covered four thematic areas: water governance, water use and services, water resilience, and integrated water resources management, which were discussed by all engaged stakeholders in a national workshop. The water compact will ensure sustainable water resources management. The paper highlighted the need for engaging the local media and the local people to get the much needed and valued feedback for possible interventions. © 2020 by the author.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17088 (URN)10.3390/SU12187339 (DOI)000584310400001 ()2-s2.0-85091555050 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-17 Created: 2021-09-17 Last updated: 2022-04-04Bibliographically approved
Durodola, O. S. & Mourad, K. A. (2020). Modelling Maize Yield and Water Requirements under Different Climate Change Scenarios. Climate, 8(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling Maize Yield and Water Requirements under Different Climate Change Scenarios
2020 (English)In: Climate, E-ISSN 2225-1154, Vol. 8, no 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

African countries such as Nigeria are anticipated to be more susceptible to the impacts of climate change due to large dependence on rainfed agriculture and to several uncertainties in the responses of crop production to climate change. The impacts of climate change on crop water requirements (CWR), irrigation water requirements (IWR), yields and crop water productivity (CWP) of rainfed maize in Ogun-Osun River Basin, Nigeria were evaluated for a baseline period (1986-2015) and future projection period (2021-2099) under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios. For the baseline period, there is no significant trend within the variables studied. However, IWR is projected to increase significantly by up to 140% in the future period, while yield might likely decline under both scenarios up to -12%. This study shows that in the future periods, supplemental irrigation has little impact in improving yields, but an increase in soil fertility can improve yields and CWP by up to 80% in 2099. This paper offers useful information on suitable adaptation measures which could be implemented by stakeholders and policymakers to counterbalance the effects of climate change on crop production.

Keywords
Nigeria, Ogun-Osun river basin, Representative Concentration Pathway, crop water productivity, soil fertility, irrigation water requirements, CROP PRODUCTION, MANN-KENDALL, RIVER-BASIN, PRODUCTIVITY, IRRIGATION, AQUACROP, AGRICULTURE, IMPACT, VARIABILITY, ADAPTATION
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-17077 (URN)10.3390/cli8110127 (DOI)000592845800001 ()2-s2.0-85095983243 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-10 Created: 2021-12-10 Last updated: 2022-04-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5358-2217

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