Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Augusto, Bruno
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Kharrazi, S., Augusto, B. & Fröjd, N. (2019). Assessing dynamics of heavy vehicles in a driving simulator. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 65, 306-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing dynamics of heavy vehicles in a driving simulator
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 65, p. 306-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates the potential of a motion based driving simulator in assessing and comparing dynamic performance of different heavy vehicles. A driving simulator study with 55 professional truck drivers is performed and the achieved results show a strong correlation between the objective and subjective measures of the different vehicles performance. The motion based driving simulator is used to compare the performance and controllability of high capacity transport vehicles with conventional heavy vehicles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-14166 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2019.07.007 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070781042 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-01 Created: 2019-10-01 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Augusto, B., Kharrazi, S. & Fröjd, N. (2019). Vehicle dynamics testing in driving simulators: a case study for heavy vehicles. Linköping
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vehicle dynamics testing in driving simulators: a case study for heavy vehicles
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

VDTestS set out to probe the potential of a driving simulator in the field of vehicle dynamics testing. For this purpose, a simulator test case was prepared embodying the nature of a vehicle dynamics test set-up. The goal was to figure out if the drivers in the simulator could identify the handling differences owed to changes in vehicle settings, while driving simulated trucks.

A truck model was validated against the performance of a real vehicle under a predefined set of manoeuvres. This was coupled with the tuning of the simulator motion to improve the perception of the vehicle dynamics. These efforts were followed by definition of a group of four test cases, each corresponding to a set of alternate vehicle properties. These sets were selected based on their potential impact on the vehicle handling and correlation with changes that could occur in a real vehicle. Finally, experiments were conducted in VTI’s motion-based driving simulator, Sim IV in Gothenburg, with participation of ten engineers and mechanics from VGTT product development well familiar with truck mechanics and truck driving. The set-up made it possible to gather feedback, about the suitability of the driving simulator in these testing conditions, from professionals in the field. Data was collected subjectively via interviews and questionnaires as well as objectively from the logs comprising of driver inputs and vehicle motions generated during the simulator drives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: , 2019. p. 38
Series
ViP publication: ViP - Virtual Prototyping and Assessment by Simulation ; 2017-3
Keywords
Vehicle, Dynamics, Vehicle handling, Test method, Simulator (driving)
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13825 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-16 Created: 2019-05-16 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Kharrazi, S., Augusto, B. & Fröjd, N. (2019). Vehicle dynamics testing in motion based driving simulators. Vehicle System Dynamics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vehicle dynamics testing in motion based driving simulators
2019 (English)In: Vehicle System Dynamics, ISSN 0042-3114, E-ISSN 1744-5159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates the potential of a motion-based driving simulator in the field of vehicle dynamics testing, specifically for heavy vehicles. For this purpose, a case study was prepared embodying the nature of a truck dynamics test setup. The goal was to investigate if the drivers in the simulator could identify the handling differences owed to changes in vehicle parameters, while driving the simulated trucks. Results show that the drivers could clearly identify the differences in vehicle behaviour for most of the performed tests, which motivates further investigative work in this area and exposes the feasibility of heavy vehicle dynamics testing in simulators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis Ltd., 2019
Keywords
Vehicle, Dynamics, Simulator (driving), Lorry, Vehicle handling, Driver, Detection, Variability
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13651 (URN)10.1080/00423114.2019.1566555 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060449273 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, A., Augusto, B., Strand, N. & Sandin, J. (2018). Drivers’ recovery performance in a critical run-off-road scenario: A driving simulator study. In: Nicole Van Nes, Charlotte Voegelé (Ed.), Proceedings of the 6th Humanist Conference, The Hague, Netherlands, 13-14 June 2018: . Paper presented at 6th Humanist Conference, The Hague, Netherlands, 13-14 June 2018 (pp. 7).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers’ recovery performance in a critical run-off-road scenario: A driving simulator study
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 6th Humanist Conference, The Hague, Netherlands, 13-14 June 2018 / [ed] Nicole Van Nes, Charlotte Voegelé, 2018, p. 7-Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Single vehicle accidents are commonly caused by fatigue and distractionand resulting in severe casualties and high economic costs. In order to evaluate driver recovery from run-off-road accidents, comprising of 80% of fatal crashes on rural roads, a simulator study in an advanced full-motion driving simulator was carried out. Drivers were given a secondary task to perform at six positions down the road (to simulate distraction), and an artificial yaw deviation was added to the vehicle to induce a run-off-road accident whilst the driver was distracted. The results show that the severity of the recovery manoeuvre was larger than similar events caused by the failure of automated lane keeping systems, leading to lane departures. Furthermore, significant learning effects was found, providing recommendations for further studies into run-off-road experiments.

Keywords
Single vehicle accident, Driving (veh), Driver, Behaviour, Simulator (driving), Steering (process), Reaction (human)
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13751 (URN)
Conference
6th Humanist Conference, The Hague, Netherlands, 13-14 June 2018
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Sandin, J., Augusto, B., Nilsson, P. & Laine, L. (2017). A lane-change scenario developed for assessment of active safety and ADAS in heavy vehicles: evaluated in a driving simulator study. Linköpng
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A lane-change scenario developed for assessment of active safety and ADAS in heavy vehicles: evaluated in a driving simulator study
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this project was to develop a lane-change scenario for driving simulators to analyse the characteristics of lane-change manoeuvres performed with heavy vehicles.

The definition of the lane-change scenario was based on a literature review, and an investigation of lane-change accidents in Sweden.

A lane-change manoeuvre is in the literature typically described by accepted gap at the initiation of the manoeuvre as well as duration of the manoeuvre and speed during the manoeuvre. The literature review showed that there is a lack of real-world data regarding lane-change manoeuvres with heavy vehicles. The data that exist are collected mainly in the US and for discretionary lane changes, and a distinction between sizes of heavy vehicles is rarely made. Regarding accidents involving heavy vehicles on European level, there is a general lack of useful and reliable accident data. The most comprehensive data are available from the US and show that lane-change accidents account for a large share of accidents involving heavy vehicles.

The investigation of lane-change accidents was made in the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA), on 10 500 police-reported accidents with heavy vehicles involved during the years 2003 to 2013. In STRADA, lane-change accidents are categorized together with overtaking accidents. Therefore, it is not possible to identify lane-change accidents and their share of heavyvehicle accidents directly from STRADA. Instead, lane-change accidents were identified by reading the accident narratives for overtaking accident and rear-end accidents (in total 5 612 accidents). Rearend accidents were included because the manner of collision may resemble lane-change collisions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköpng: , 2017. p. 38
Series
ViP publication: ViP - Virtual Prototyping and Assessment by Simulation ; 2017-1
Keywords
Lane changing, Active safety system, Advanced driver assistance system, Driver assistance system, Gap acceptance, Accident, Simulator (driving), Evaluation (assessment)
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology; 90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13267 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-09-20 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Wanner, D., Kreußlein, M., Augusto, B., Drugge, L. & Stensson Trigell, A. (2016). Single wheel hub motor failures and their impact on vehicle and driver behaviour. Vehicle System Dynamics, 54(10), 1345-1361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single wheel hub motor failures and their impact on vehicle and driver behaviour
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Vehicle System Dynamics, ISSN 0042-3114, E-ISSN 1744-5159, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 1345-1361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research work studies the impact of single wheel hub motor failures on the dynamic behaviour of electric vehicles and the corresponding driver reactions. An experimental study in a moving-base driving simulator is conducted to analyse the influence of single wheel hub motor failures for motorway speeds. Driver reaction times are derived from the measured data and discussed in their experimental context. The failure is rated objectively on the dynamic behaviour of the vehicle and compared to the subjective evaluation. Findings indicate that critical traffic situations impairing traffic safety can occur for motorway speeds. Clear counteractions by the drivers had to be taken.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Engine, Failure, Driver, Behaviour, Reaction time, Vehicle, Dynamics, Simulator (driving)
National Category
Vehicle Engineering Applied Psychology
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour; 90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 911 Road: Components of the vehicle
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-10807 (URN)10.1080/00423114.2016.1201124 (DOI)000384259800001 ()2-s2.0-84979084573 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-12 Created: 2016-08-09 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Sandin, J., Augusto, B., Nilsson, P. & Laine, L. (2015). A Lane-Change Gap Acceptance Scenario Developed for Heavy Vehicle Active Safety Assessment: A Driving Simulator Study. In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology Towards zero traffic accidents, 2015: . Paper presented at FAST-zero 2015 Symposium, September 9-11, Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 537-543).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Lane-Change Gap Acceptance Scenario Developed for Heavy Vehicle Active Safety Assessment: A Driving Simulator Study
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology Towards zero traffic accidents, 2015, 2015, p. 537-543Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aims of this study were to develop a lane-change scenario for driving simulators in order to analyse the characteristics of lane-change manoeuvres performed with heavy vehicles. The scenario was set up based on information from lane-change accidents and on-road lane-change observations. The gap acceptance scenario consisted of two consecutive lane changes were the intention was to study truck drivers’ accepted gap between two vehicles in the adjacent right lane, at the initiation of each lane change. An experiment was conducted with 18 truck drivers in a full-motion driving simulator with implemented high fidelity models of an 80tonnes and 32m long vehicle combination and a 40tonnes and 22m tractor semi-trailer. The results showed no statistically significant difference in the accepted gaps to the lead and lag vehicles in the target lane. For both heavy vehicles, the overall average lead gap and lag gap was estimated to 0.85s and 0.83s respectively, at the average velocity of 17.3m/s. The difference in lane-change duration for the two vehicles was statistically significant and estimated to an average of 8.7s for the tractor semi-trailer, and 10.5s for the A-double. The conclusion from the present study is that the drivers performed the lane changes equally well with the tractor semi-trailer and the long vehicle combination. There were no major differences between the manoeuvres other than the duration times, which can be justified by the difference in vehicle length. Future studies are able to use this scenario as a non-critical reference to more critical events in the development and assessment of active safety functionality and automated driving systems.

Keywords
Simulator (driving), Traffic lane, Change, Heavy vehicle, Articulated vehicle, Semi trailer, Vehicle spacing, Driver, Behaviour
National Category
Vehicle Engineering Applied Psychology
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour; 90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-8024 (URN)
Conference
FAST-zero 2015 Symposium, September 9-11, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2016-04-18Bibliographically approved
Sandin, J., Augusto, B., Johansson, R., Svanberg, B. & Petersson, M. (2015). Evaluation of a Run-off-Road Scenario for Driving Simulators used for the Assessment of Automatic Steering-Wheel Interventions. In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology Towards zero traffic accidents, 2015: . Paper presented at FAST-zero 2015 Symposium, September 9-11, Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 545-550).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a Run-off-Road Scenario for Driving Simulators used for the Assessment of Automatic Steering-Wheel Interventions
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology Towards zero traffic accidents, 2015, 2015, p. 545-550Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The setup of a run-off-road scenario was based on the current knowledge about critical run-off-road situations and accidents. The scenario was initiated by a visual secondary task. During the task, an added clockwise yaw deviation, intended to create the run-off-road scenario, was presented visually but not by the vehicle dynamics or the lateral acceleration of the simulator’s motion system. Results from two experiments show that the drivers frequently neutralised the yaw deviation because of their lack of full attention to the secondary task, the occasionally rough yaw deviation, or a combination of both. Because of the frequently neutralised yaw deviations, the number of steering-wheel interventions from an implemented system, intended to steer back into the lane in run-off-road situations, became limited in number. The system generated in total 14 steering-wheel interventions, ranging from torque levels of 0.3 to 3.7Nm. During ten of the interventions, the driver counteracted the torque with one hand. Nevertheless, the drivers that had experienced the interventions would like to have a system that could steer back to the lane when approaching the road edge, and accept that it takes control of the steering wheel. Further research on shared steering control is required so that driver responses to interventions does not neutralise the intended safety benefit of the system.

Keywords
Run off the road (accid), Single vehicle accident, Simulator (driving), Driving aid (electronic), Test, Distraction, Reaction time
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-8025 (URN)
Conference
FAST-zero 2015 Symposium, September 9-11, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2016-07-06Bibliographically approved
Hansson, P., Stenbeck, A., Kusachov, A., Bruzelius, F. & Augusto, B. (2015). Prepositioning of driving simulator motion systems. International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, 10(3), 288-304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prepositioning of driving simulator motion systems
Show others...
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing, ISSN 1745-6444, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 288-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Motion base driving simulators have limited space in which to recreate the motions of the simulated road vehicle. Conventional motion cueing algorithms strive to centre the cabin in the simulator motion envelope to accommodate accelerations in a worst case scenario while respecting the physical boundaries. Using information about the road ahead one can preposition the cabin to an off-centre point, virtually increasing the available space so that larger motions are made possible. The prepositioning algorithm presented here was developed as an addition to a classical motion cueing algorithm and makes use of road data and vehicle speed to adjust the simulator displacement. Simulations show that the amount of acceleration presented by an x, y-sled system can, with prepositioning, be increased by up to 25% in longitudinal and 53% in lateral direction for an example road. A comparative study including 12 test subjects indicates that the perceived realism is rated higher with prepositioning.

Keywords
Simulator (driving), Movement, Perception, Mathematical model, Acceleration
National Category
Vehicle Engineering Control Engineering
Research subject
90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-8211 (URN)10.1504/IJVSMT.2015.070165 (DOI)2-s2.0-84934288095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2017-03-30Bibliographically approved
Kusachov, A., Bruzelius, F., Augusto, B. & Fischer, M. (2015). The Importance of Yaw Rotation Centre on the Driver Behaviour. In: : . Paper presented at DSC 2015 Conference. Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibiton. 16-18 Sept 2015, Tübingen, Germany. Tübingen, Germany
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Yaw Rotation Centre on the Driver Behaviour
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Yaw motion feedback plays an important role for the perception of motion in driving simulators. This paper investigates the momentary rotation points’ importance on the driver behaviour, through a simulator experiment.

A double lane change manoeuvre was used to measure the driver behaviour and perception for two different rotation point presentations; steady state and dynamic. Only subtle differences in driver behaviour and perception could be noticed, but the dynamic rotation point is favourable. This is more prominent for low friction driving.

The results of this work show that the momentary rotation point, i.e. the point in which the planar motion can be described by a single rotation, contains information that is valuable to the driver. This motion can be represented by most motion platforms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tübingen, Germany: , 2015
Keywords
Simulator (driving), Yaw rate, Driver, Perception, Moving, Rotation
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
90 Road: Vehicles and vehicle technology, 91 Road: Vehicle design and construction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-8236 (URN)
Conference
DSC 2015 Conference. Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibiton. 16-18 Sept 2015, Tübingen, Germany
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2016-08-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications