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Antonson, H. & Levin, L. (2018). A crack in the Swedish welfare façade?: A review of assessing social impacts in transport infrastructure planning. Progress in Planning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A crack in the Swedish welfare façade?: A review of assessing social impacts in transport infrastructure planning
2018 (English)In: Progress in Planning, ISSN 0305-9006, E-ISSN 1873-4510Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

A comparison of social impact categorisation in strategic planning across European Union Member States shows that Sweden neither categorises nor breaks down categories of social impact in areas such as transport infrastructure development. This article accordingly studies how social issues are handled during transport infrastructure planning. An analysis of different source materials will answer four research questions:

  1. To what extent are social impacts integrated into environmental impact assessment (EIA) reports?
  2. Are social impacts sufficiently integrated and/or does this treatment simply amount to ‘good practice’?
  3. Can any trend be detected over time in terms of addressing social issues in impact assessments?
  4. What key measures could increase the influence of social impact issues on transport infrastructure planning practice?

The study involved a content analysis of six EIA handbooks and EIA statements (EISs) for 18 large transport infrastructure projects. The concepts searched for in these documents largely apply to issues of vulnerability, health, social problems, perceived safety, and alienation. Our data were interpreted through the theoretical lens of institutional interplay. We found that though social aspects are not new considerations in EIA research, they are included in only a small proportion of the 18 Swedish EISs, mostly in connection with health and accessibility. We also found that the more recent documents allotted less space to social issues. It is unlikely that most individuals in the organisations that order EISs, or the consultancies that write them, are unaware of the broader interpretation of ‘human beings’ which includes social aspects.

The conclusion is that in the absence of a government initiative to clarify how social impacts can be addressed in transport infrastructure planning, there is a need for an external network for organisations involved in transport infrastructure EISs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Transport, Planning, Social factors, Environmental impact assessment study, Safety, Health, Sociology, Accessibility, Organization (administration), Transport authority
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13558 (URN)10.1016/j.progress.2018.11.001 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058710730 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Jägerbrand, A., Antonson, H. & Ahlström, C. (2018). Speed reduction effects over distance of animal-vehicle collision countermeasures: a driving simulator study. European Transport Research Review, 10(2), Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speed reduction effects over distance of animal-vehicle collision countermeasures: a driving simulator study
2018 (English)In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study examined if speed reduction effects from animal-vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures are merely local or do extend to a wider area, and what implications the results have on road planning practice regarding AVCs.

Methods: Twenty-five drivers drove repeatedly on a 9-km long road stretch in a high-fidelity driving simulator. The development of vehicle speed in the surrounding of an automatic speed camera, a wildlife warning sign and a radio message, were investigated in a full factorial within-subject experiment. The factors wildlife fence (with/without) and forest (dense/open landscape) were also included.

Results: The radio warning message had the largest influence on vehicle speed with a speed reduction of 8 km/h that lasted beyond 1 km and 2 km after the implementation. Eighty-eight per cent of the drivers reported being made extra aware of AVC due to the radio message, which was also associated with stress, insecurity and unsafety. The warning sign reduced vehicle speed by 1.5 km/h, but speed reductions were not significantly reduced 1 km after the implementation. Only 8 % of the drivers felt insecure/unsafe after passing the wildlife warning sign, explaining its limited impact on speed. There were no main effects of the automatic speed camera on vehicle speed at longer distances after implementation.

Conclusions: We recommend that AVC countermeasures should be of various design, occur at various segments along the road, and preferably be adaptive and geo-localized to minimize habituation effects on drivers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag, 2018
Keywords
Animal protection, Speed, Decrease, Accident prevention, Simulator (driving), Driver, Reaction (human)
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
30 Road: Highway design, 34 Road: Safety devices; 80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 81 Road: Accidents
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-13240 (URN)10.1186/s12544-018-0314-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052734562 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Robertson, K. & Antonson, H. (2017). Hållbara turistresor i transportplaneringen: analys och utvecklingsförslag. Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hållbara turistresor i transportplaneringen: analys och utvecklingsförslag
2017 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
Sustainable tourist travel in transport planning : analysis and suggestions for further development
Abstract [sv]

Tillväxtverkets statistik visar att turismen i Sverige ökar och därmed ökar också dess betydelse för Sveriges totala ekonomi, export och sysselsättning. Samtidigt uppkommer miljöeffekter och andra effekter av turisternas resande. Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka hur turisters resande och turistresandets hållbarhet hanteras i infrastrukturplaneringen samt att identifiera eventuella utvecklingsbehov. Studierna fokuserar på den regionala och lokala planeringen, men även den nationella planeringen tas upp och behovet av samordning och samverkan i planeringen diskuteras. Två delstudier, en dokumentanalys och en intervjustudie, har genomförts för fyra destinationer (fallstudier) av olika karaktär. Dessa är Kiruna, Åre, Sälen och Vimmerby/Astrid Lindgrens Värld. Studien utgör en del i ett större projekt som även publiceras i en syntesrapport.

Den samlade bild som framträder av intervjuerna är en relativt fragmenterad planering. Många olika perspektiv och målsättningar ska hanteras i den regionala och lokala planeringen, men kunskapsnivån bland dem som är involverade i planeringen och tillgången till eller tillämpningen av olika planeringsstöd svarar inte mot behoven. Flera intervjuade lyfter fram åtgärdsvalsstudier som en bra modell för framtagning av underlag för beslut och prioriteringar samt för samverkan. Kompletterade med tydligare central styrning och stöd avseende prioriteringar mellan olika typer av mål och målsättningar såsom hållbarhet kan troligen åtgärdsvalsstudier utgöra en bra modell för vidareutvecklingen av planeringen för hantering av bredare perspektiv som inkluderar hållbarhet och turism.

Ytterligare exempel på identifierade utvecklingsbehov är tydligare och uttalat ansvar för turism och hållbarhet i den nationella planeringen, vidareutveckling av processer, rutiner, information och kommunikation i samordnad planering samt kompetenshöjning avseende tillämpningen av riktlinjer och verktyg i planeringen.

Abstract [en]

Statistics show that tourism in Sweden is increasing, thus increasing its importance for the overall economy, exports and employment. However, tourism is also associated with environmental and other effects, for example from tourist travel. The objective of this study was to investigate how tourist travel and sustainable tourist travel are included in infrastructure planning and to identify potential development needs. The studies focus on regional and local planning, but also the national planning is addressed, and the need for coordination and cooperation in the planning is discussed. Two substudies, a document analysis and an interview study were conducted in four destinations (case studies) with different characteristics. These are Kiruna, Åre, Sälen and Vimmerby / Astrid Lindgren’s World. The study is part of a larger project, which is also published in a synthesis report.

The overall picture emerging from the interviews is a relatively fragmented planning. Many different perspectives and objectives need to be addressed in regional and local planning, but the level of knowledge in planning and access to or application of different planning support does not correspond to the needs. Several interviewees highlight “åtgärdsvalsstudier” as a good model for the development of grounds for decisions and priorities, and for cooperation between actors. Complemented with clearer central governance and support regarding priorities between different types of goals and objectives, for example sustainability, this may be a good model for further development of planning for including broader and additional perspectives, for example sustainability and tourism.

Further examples of identified development needs are clearer and explicit responsibility for tourism and sustainability in national planning, further development of processes, routines, information and communication in coordinated planning as well as better knowledge regarding the application of guidelines and tools in planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2017. p. 60
Series
VTI rapport, ISSN 0347-6030 ; 934
National Category
Environmental Analysis and Construction Information Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-11936 (URN)
Projects
Hållbara turistresor
Available from: 2017-07-10 Created: 2017-07-05 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, K., Antonson, H. & Eriksson, L. (2017). Layering and parallel policy making: Complementary concepts for understanding implementation challenges related to sustainable mobility. Transport Policy, 53, 50-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Layering and parallel policy making: Complementary concepts for understanding implementation challenges related to sustainable mobility
2017 (English)In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 53, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is focused on implementation challenges related to the integration of sustainable mobility in strategic local/regional land use and transport planning. The work was based on a case study of Stockholm, Sweden, focusing on four current plans and strategies of key importance for sustainable mobility. We identify and discuss implementation challenges related to sustainable mobility using a theoretical framework from the policy integration literature, with a focus on the dimensions of “layering”, “drift” and “exhaustion” (Rayner & Howlett 2009).

The empirical analysis led us to identify a complementary dimension which we call ‘Parallel policy making’. The parallel policy making reflects a fundamental lack of integration of sustainable mobility in policies and plans of strategic importance, which hinders effective policy integration. Altogether, we conclude that a better insight into the practice of parallel policy making is crucial for development of more effective implementation strategies for sustainable mobility in Stockholm and elsewhere.

Keywords
Sustainability, Policy, Land use, Planning
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning; 10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning, 15 Road: Environment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-10961 (URN)10.1016/j.tranpol.2016.08.014 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Antonson, H., Hrelja, R. & Henriksson, P. (2017). People and parking requirements: Residential attitudes and day-to-day consequences of a land use policy shift towards sustainable mobility. Land use policy (62), 213-222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>People and parking requirements: Residential attitudes and day-to-day consequences of a land use policy shift towards sustainable mobility
2017 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, no 62, p. 213-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A land use policy shift is taking place in a growing number of cities regarding parking, whereby a conventional supply management approach is being replaced with a parking management approach. As part of this policy shift, many cities are lowering their parking requirements.

This study analysed changes in car use, car ownership, spatial parking patterns and the consequences for the everyday life of residents in a housing area with a relatively restrictive parking requirement in Gothenburg, the second largest city in Sweden. The housing area, a concrete example of how lowering parking requirements can be used to achieve targets on reduced car use and sustainable urban development, is used to discuss how parking policy should be applied to achieve the desired effect.

The results show that the consequences of the restrictive requirement was paradoxically small in the study area. In practice, the requirement did not result in a decrease in the number of parking spaces, because e.g. of access to parking in neighbouring residential areas. This shows how important it is to adopt a holistic approach in parking policy, by e.g.introducing more restrictive parking requirements in parallel with other measures, such as raising parking charges and decreasing the number of public parking spaces. It also shows that planning of parking must be coordinated with other urban planning functions. Otherwise, the actual contribution of a shift in parking policy to the development of a more environmentally friendly transport system and city risks being small, despite lower parking requirements

Keywords
Parking, Residential area, Land use, Impact study, Vehicle ownership, Car, Use
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
20 Road: Traffic engineering, 22 Road: Traffic control and traffic information
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-11393 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2016.12.022 (DOI)2-s2.0-85008885227 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Antonson, H. & Carlson, A. (2017). Spatial planning and electric vehicles. A qualitative case study of horizontal and vertical organisational interplay in southern Sweden. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 1-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial planning and electric vehicles. A qualitative case study of horizontal and vertical organisational interplay in southern Sweden
2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The use of electric-powered vehicles (EV) is experiencing a boom in some countries. Much research has been conducted on the technology per se; however, there is a research gap regarding institutional spatial planning practice concerning EVs. Here, an empirical analysis was made of planners’ interpretations of opportunities and obstacles to integration of EVs in southern Sweden. The results revealed a lack of interplay between local and regional administrations and showed that the agenda is run by individual bureaucrats rather than being based on official strategies. Moreover, there appears to be a lack of horizontal interplay within some organisations, while new arenas are being formed by actors within and outside government. The reason for formation of such external EV networks may be a single actor not being able to push the issue forward alone, due to a fragmented organisation, or a lack of clear external task formulation at central government level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Electric vehicle, Planning, Local authority, Climate change, Case study, Interview
National Category
Public Administration Studies
Research subject
10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-12008 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2017.1349653 (DOI)2-s2.0-85025163965 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-09 Created: 2017-08-09 Last updated: 2017-08-25Bibliographically approved
Wu, C.-J., Isaksson, K. & Antonson, H. (2017). The struggle to achieve holistic landscape planning: Lessons from planning the E6 road route through Tanum World Heritage Site, Sweden. Land use policy, 67, 167-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The struggle to achieve holistic landscape planning: Lessons from planning the E6 road route through Tanum World Heritage Site, Sweden
2017 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 67, p. 167-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the EU introduced the European Landscape Convention (ELC) in 2000, the landscape has received growing attention in spatial planning and environmental impact assessments. To promote implementation of the ELC, the Swedish National Heritage Board proposed its Landscape Vision 2020, which addresses the goal of a ‘holistic landscape policy’. This study examined challenges and benefits brought by such a holistic approach to handling landscape protection/management within four issues in planning practice, namely cross-sector cooperation, local participation, integrating culture and nature, and bridging past and future. The analysis focused on a controversial road project passing through a World Heritage Site in Sweden. The results showed that the four issues were closely interlinked. In the case study, a new wave of cross-sector cooperation at authority level was observed, but it was also found to dominate the entire planning process and eventually limit the achievement of the other three issues. In conclusion, this study identified institutional culture and political context as key explanatory factors for understanding how the ELC and a holistic landscape view can be implemented in national practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Landscape plan, Organization (administration), Planning, Policy, Transport authority, Public participation
National Category
Landscape Architecture
Research subject
30 Road: Highway design, 31 Road: Geometric design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-11899 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2017.05.036 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020262182 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Jägerbrand, A. & Antonson, H. (2016). Driving behaviour responses to a moose encounter, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message determined in a factorial simulator study. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 86, 229-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Driving behaviour responses to a moose encounter, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message determined in a factorial simulator study
2016 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 86, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a driving simulator study, driving behaviour responses (speed and deceleration) to encountering a moose, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message, with or without a wildlife fence and in dense forest or open landscape, were analysed. The study consisted of a factorial experiment that examined responses to factors singly and in combination over 9-km road stretches driven eight times by 25 participants (10 men, 15 women). The aims were to: determine the most effective animal–vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures in reducing vehicle speed and test whether these are more effective in combination for reducing vehicle speed; identify the most effective countermeasures on encountering moose; and determine whether the driving responses to AVC countermeasures are affected by the presence of wildlife fences and landscape characteristics. The AVC countermeasures that proved most effective in reducing vehicle speed were a wildlife warning sign and radio message, while automatic speed cameras had a speed-increasing effect. There were no statistically significant interactions between different countermeasures and moose encounters. However, there was a tendency for a stronger speed-reducing effect from the radio message warning and from a combination of a radio message and wildlife warning sign in velocity profiles covering longer driving distances than the statistical tests. Encountering a moose during the drive had the overall strongest speed-reducing effect and gave the strongest deceleration, indicating that moose decoys or moose artwork might be useful as speed-reducing countermeasures. Furthermore, drivers reduced speed earlier on encountering a moose in open landscape and had lower velocity when driving past it. The presence of a wildlife fence on encountering the moose resulted in smaller deceleration.

Keywords
Simulator (driving), Driver, Behaviour, Wildlife crossing, Animal, Camera, Surveillance, Warning, Radio, Message, Landscape
National Category
Applied Psychology Fish and Wildlife Management
Research subject
80 Road: Traffic safety and accidents, 841 Road: Road user behaviour
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-8219 (URN)10.1016/j.aap.2015.11.004 (DOI)000367105600026 ()26600095 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84947557382 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 802-0224-09
Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Jacobsen, J. K. & Antonson, H. (2016). Motivational segments for trips along the high coast byway of Sweden: a study of local leisure excursions and domestic holidaymaking. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivational segments for trips along the high coast byway of Sweden: a study of local leisure excursions and domestic holidaymaking
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This on-site study investigated local leisure travellers’ and domestic tourists’ motivations for taking summer trips along the High Coast of Sweden, a byway designated with brown signage as a national tourism route, responding to a dearth of research on why people are motivated to use scenic byways. Non-local Swedish leisure travellers at selected locations along the byway were asked to fill in self-completion questionnaires and hand them back to the project staff.

The most emphasised motivations for taking this trip were “getting away from everyday life”, “beautiful view from the road”, and “interesting landscape”. Based on factor analysis, three motivational patterns were identified:

  1. sightseeing and outdoor life
  2. getting away and travelling around
  3. a quick route to family and friends

The route attracted a large proportion of local and regional repeaters with ties to the area through family and friends and/or second homes; only 18% were on their first visit. There were considerable motivational differences between those people who were going to a second home in the area and other visitors. Among travellers who did not visit a second home, there were few motivational differences between day-trippers and persons with overnight stay(s), corroborating blurred distinctions between excursionists and tourists. The large proportions of local and regional visitors indicated that extra-regional route promotion may be improved.

Keywords
Tourism, Motivation, Questionnaire, Highway
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning, 11 Road: Personal transport
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-9257 (URN)10.1080/15022250.2015.1133318 (DOI)2-s2.0-84958522378 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Antonson, H., Isaksson, K., Storbjörk, S. & Hjerpe, M. (2016). Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden. Land use policy, 52, 297-305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden
2016 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Putting climate change policy-integration into practice is challenged by problems of institutional misfit, due to, inter alia, deficient vertical administrative interplay. While most focus within the field of climate change research has targeted the national-local interplay, less is known about the interface of regional and local perspectives.

Here, the aim is to study that interface with a specific focus on the relation between regional and local spatial planning actors, through a case-study of transport and coastal zone management in a Swedish municipality. The article is based on interviews (focus group and single in-depth) and official planning documents.

The material reveals a tricky planning situation, replete with conflict. In practice, various institutional frameworks, claims and ambitions collide. The attempts to steer the local spatial planning initiatives from the regional level led to conflicts, which in turn seems to have hampered the overall work for climate change management through spatial planning. Furthermore, there are few traces of prospects of a smooth vertical institutional interplay able to support the overall aims related to integrating climate change mitigation and adaptation in spatial planning.

Keywords
Climate change, Policy, Local authority, Planning, Land use
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-9256 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.12.033 (DOI)2-s2.0-84953431614 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7828-3640

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